Making a Sleeping Bag/Sleeping Quilt

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ConnieD
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Making a Sleeping Bag/Sleeping Quilt

Postby ConnieD » Sun Mar 25, 2012 2:03 pm

Here is video showing the process.



This isn't the first video I have seen, that shows using a vacuum cleaner to put the down in the baffles in the sleeping bag. This is, however, the best video I have seen for using a hot knife to cut many layers of nylon at once. I have seen this process at Imperial Wetsuit. But this particular video also mentions using a round tip needle for sewing nylon.

Anyone else have experience with sewing machine needle selection for lightweight nylon fabric for a sleeping bag/sleeping quilt?

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zelph
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Re: Making a Sleeping Bag/Sleeping Quilt

Postby zelph » Sun Mar 25, 2012 10:35 pm

Did it say in the vid that it was a hot knife? Looked like a motorized unit.
"Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained" stove store = http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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ConnieD
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Re: Making a Sleeping Bag/Sleeping Quilt

Postby ConnieD » Sun Mar 25, 2012 10:56 pm

No.

I thought it was a hot knife because I have seen hot knifes used for that purpose.

The layers of fabric are not pressed down. The long steel "ruler" is use to float the fabric layer on the underlayer.

The round-end needle is interesting, for sure.

How the down is put inside is interesting.

I have seen 900-fill down sold retail in one-ounce plastic bags. It would seen to me, it might be easier to one-ounce in each 6" wide baffle, as one sleeping quilt manufacturer states. I would offset the baffles to avoid the sewn-thru losses. I would sew them on and slide the fabric over to make it a slant-baffle, then, stitch up the edges.

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zelph
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Re: Making a Sleeping Bag/Sleeping Quilt

Postby zelph » Sun Mar 25, 2012 11:20 pm

I would sew them on and slide the fabric over to make it a slant-baffle, then, stitch up the edges.


Me also would do it that way and use the rounded point needle. The rounded needle was a good point/hint ;)

Using a vaccuum to blow the down was interesting. Thanks for the instructional video. Don't think I'd try the DIY down projects. I'd have it flying everywhere :roll: :oops:
"Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained" stove store = http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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ConnieD
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Re: Making a Sleeping Bag/Sleeping Quilt

Postby ConnieD » Tue Mar 27, 2012 11:10 am

check it out...

Here is a sewing hint for almost pucker-free seams in lightweight fabrics:
http://paulaslongwalk.wordpress.com/201 ... wn-quilts/

I would think the thread selection and tension setting on the sewing machine would have a lot to do with getting a pucker-free seam. But I have seen this "tear away fabric stabilizer"... I have seen people sew right thru the pattern tissue and tear it off.

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zelph
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Re: Making a Sleeping Bag/Sleeping Quilt

Postby zelph » Tue Mar 27, 2012 1:53 pm

I've seen that on "sewing with Nancy" tv show. Cool way to do it.

One of the first comments made was:

Responses to “Almost Pucker-free Seams on Down Quilts”
Learning to adjust your thread tension correctly and hold the fabric as you sew will give even better results with much less effort. The key to starting a seam without puckering is to hold the thread tail in tension as you start. As I sew ultra-light fabric, I hold both sides to keep it flat as it feeds. I also use tailors chalk to mark lines instead of scotch tape. Adding sticky products is just not nessasary and pins should never be used on down products. I have built two Thru-hiker quilt kits with great results. Take your time and practice on scraps.


I would think the pucker would prevent heet loss through the seam, to an extent ;)
"Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained" stove store = http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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ConnieD
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Re: Making a Sleeping Bag/Sleeping Quilt

Postby ConnieD » Tue Mar 27, 2012 4:23 pm

I was taught to how the tails of the thread in very slight tension and use both hands to help guide the fabric through.

I didn't realise how important that is.

I do know the three seams of somewhat heavy thread on the ridgeline of my Oware AsymTarp 1 are excellent. I can pull that tarp taut without a worry. It is a flat seam.

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zelph
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Re: Making a Sleeping Bag/Sleeping Quilt

Postby zelph » Tue Mar 27, 2012 8:58 pm

I'm doing my best at trying to get caught up on stove stuff so I can get my sewing machine out and do some sewing. I need to get my "flat" hammock in the works. It's going to be a modification to my GrizzBridge. It's the fastest way to satisfy my ideas on how to give me a flat lay on my tummy. I've given it so much thought I can taste success :lol:
"Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained" stove store = http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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ConnieD
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Re: Making a Sleeping Bag/Sleeping Quilt

Postby ConnieD » Tue Mar 27, 2012 9:47 pm

I am like that. I like to find out everything I can, get the design concept "thought-experiment" details thrashed out, and proceed. I think many creative people are like that: I think this explains why their first design idea often is the best version.

Refinements, maybe. Fiddling around too much loses the initial original idea.

Many times, in this forum, I have seen the initial idea of people come through for them. Refinements, maybe.

I think I have gathered sufficient information to do a good job, on the aluminized nylon.

I think I am ready to spend $ on the good fabrics I like.

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ConnieD
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Re: Making a Sleeping Bag/Sleeping Quilt

Postby ConnieD » Mon Apr 09, 2012 1:04 pm

I used a pencil soldering iron from Radio Shack to cut the frayed edge of nylon ripstop.

I would think the lowest temperature and work fast along a steel edge would give best results.


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