On sale

Discuss commercially made shelters.
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ConnieD
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Re: On sale

Postby ConnieD » Sun Feb 12, 2012 9:30 pm

It looks more like hut trekking, in Europe or in Nepal.

If they served hot foods, absolutely.

I have heard of "trail angels" on The Appalachian Trail serving hot food. Really.

This area, cadyak, is part of The Applachian Trail ?

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cadyak
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AT shelters

Postby cadyak » Mon Feb 13, 2012 10:00 am

This shelter has not too long ago been completely refurbished. It is in the Great Smokies National Park and on the Appalachian Trail. I would agree that it is a cadillac of shelters. There are certain benefits to staying in shelters. You dont have take the time to set up a tent, so you can even pack lighter. A lot of them have privies. But boy in the wintertime it takes some serious resolve to sit on an ice covered metal toilet seat. :o :o
In really terrible weather they are certainly more fun than being tentbound. It is much easier to dry your wet equipment in a shelter. I do also enjoy meeting new people and hearing their stories.
I much prefer to sleep in a tent or tarp though.
I am a very light sleeper and I dont sleep well when bunking it up with 9 snoring dudes (and ladies) .
Shelters, (even this one) get very dirty. The dust inside them is so fine it permeates everything. My equipment stays a lot cleaner when staying under a tarp with a ground cloth. It takes me a lot longer to get going in the mornings when that many people are wandering about trying to cook/eat/pack at the same time. For that reason it is nice to get a shelter to yourself sometimes. I actually get much colder in a shelter too. They will often put a tarp over the front of the shelter but there is still a lot more air moving through there than in an enclosed tent. We will most often do a combination of shelters and tent camping. IT ALL beats sitting in this dang chair for 9hrs a day. :D

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ConnieD
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Re: On sale

Postby ConnieD » Mon Feb 13, 2012 10:16 am

cadyak, I much prefer to sleep in a tent or tarp though.

I think I will appreciate my Shangri La 3 even more, knowing that about those shelters.

I did think of it as a luxury tarp. It is interesting, to me, I do not think of it as a tent.

I had a magenta and silver Black Diamond Megamid. It was beautiful inside. I could stand up. However, it was too big for me, because a smaller shelter will hold in the warmth.

It is only because of these "small wood stoves for hunter's tents" I had started seeing at YouTube, I started that thread here. viewtopic.php?f=60&t=4539&hilit

It is the number of really creative ideas found there and in other threads in the "Wood Stoves" section, here, I believed a more generously-sized shelter could be kept warm in cold conditions. The fact is, I wanted it to be beautiful because it is no fun to be stuck inside a tent designed for backpacking because it is raining, or snowing, hard.

It may seem odd, but esthetic beauty helps me get through any difficulty.

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zelph
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Re: On sale

Postby zelph » Tue Feb 14, 2012 1:08 am

IT ALL beats sitting in this dang chair for 9hrs a day.
cadyak


That's too many :mrgreen:
"Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained" stove store = http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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ConnieD
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Re: On sale

Postby ConnieD » Mon Apr 09, 2012 1:00 pm

I have used the Shangri-La 3 in winter.

The size/volume is right for one or cozy for two.

My Black Diamond Megamid was right for two and too big for one: I couldn't warm it up on my own.

In fact, that is what got me interested in "small wood stoves for hunter's tents".

I don't have my stove made, but I did clip the aluminized ripstop nylon in place at the backside of the Shangri La 3. It reflected heat back on my sleeping area opposite the door. I kept the top of the door unzipped, even so the heat from my zelph-stoveworks Woodgaz Folding stove, my DarenN MK1-UL or my cadyak Fire Mug was sufficient with only my 20F down Brooks-Range Elephant Foot half bag and hooded down jacket and PolarWrap balaclava on my Exped Down Mat 7 XS.

I am looking for an overnight burn.

I can get titanium components for the roll-up stovepipe for $32.50 from Ti-Goat: I want the small diameter roll-up stovepipe. If I have the longer stove-body and a shelf inside to make the smoke go back-to-front to back again to reach the stovepipe chimney, I think I will make the most of the heat from a small stove type of the "small wood stoves for hunter's tents".

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zelph
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Re: On sale

Postby zelph » Mon Apr 09, 2012 11:54 pm

ConnieD wrote:I I couldn't warm it up on my own.

In fact, that is what got me interested in "small wood stoves for hunter's tents".

I am looking for an overnight burn.

I can get titanium components for the roll-up stovepipe for $32.50 from Ti-Goat: I want the small diameter roll-up stovepipe. If I have the longer stove-body and a shelf inside to make the smoke go back-to-front to back again to reach the stovepipe chimney, I think I will make the most of the heat from a small stove type of the "small wood stoves for hunter's tents".


How are you going to get an overnight burn in a small stove?
"Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained" stove store = http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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ConnieD
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Re: On sale

Postby ConnieD » Tue Apr 10, 2012 12:50 am

I get an overnight burn in my Wilderness Stove by using cherry wood and having thick pieces of spruce bark in there.

It is the length I plan, the width I plan, only the height is lower in my plan and the stovepipe is 2-3/8" not 3".

I am thinking, if I have a shelf baffle inside I will get the most heat out of a smouldering fire in that size/volume tent.

I am bringing the stove inside, the stovepipe going out the door via the upper opening two-way zip on the Shangri-La 3 door. (This is only for Montana Winter.)

The stove size/volume is more easily changed: 1. Ti-Goat has 12" and 18" width titanium available for the stove body. 2. I have two size diameter plates for the end pieces to change the diameter. 3. The ready rod length and wing-nuts are not difficult.

If nothing will serve, the sleep-system will have to do the job.

I have a -30 F sleeping bag. However, I need a pulk to drag it all around. I would rather not have to do that. ;)

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ConnieD
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Re: On sale

Postby ConnieD » Tue Apr 10, 2012 4:11 am

I think there is something else here where "we are not on the same page".

How much fire do you need?

In Montana Winter, 70 F inside a tent is not desireable. If you are standing around in light clothing in the cook tent of a guided hunting trip, maybe.

In a tent for a winter camp 50 F is better, wearing your winter clothing and keeping the shelter up to no more than 50 F so you are only putting on your outdoor coat, hat and gloves, and cold weather boots to step outside.

The winter camp is an active lifestyle choice. I am not spending the majority of the day in inactivity.

I am not in my warm house wearing only lightweight clothing, only donning my heavy winter clothing to go out to the car or to walk out to pick up the U.S. Mail.

How much fire do you need? I have a Shangri-La 3 tent. I have one person.

The answer is a function of the R-value of the shelter (a tent R-value is not negligible - a tent does make a difference if the size and volume is appropriate to the number of occupants) the air turnover and the volume of the shelter. It is the same consideration as any central heating system, factoring in the number of occupants.

I need a small fire. I need no more than 50 F inside because my 20 F rated sleep-system is too warm if it is more than 50 F and my winter clothing for inactivity, or, minimum activity, is too warm if it is more than 50 F. The warmest temperature I can sleep through the night in the 20 F sleep-system is no more than 50 F.

I have three levels of winter clothing: in fact, my winter clothing for walking around outdoors is too warm if it is more than 20 F or -5 F or -20 F outdoors. I also have three levels of winter sleep-systems: 20 F, 0 F, and -30 F. I can use one, two or three of my sleep systems to sleep comfortably warm through the entire night. I am always wearing one of the three levels of winter clothing for indoors. I only put on the outer coat, hat, gloves, and cold-weather boots if I go outside.

I am not considering the 0 F or the -30 F sleep system, because I want a winter camp I can easily backpack, not dragging a pulk. If I had a more expensive ultralightweight 0 F and -30 F sleep system, I would consider the appropriate winter camp setup. However, I am not considering that at this time.

If there is an unanticipated and sudden drop in the ambient temperature, I can put everything on and hike out.

The stove only has to match the difference between the ambient temperature and the desired temperature.

Therefore, I do not need much fire for the sleep system, the clothing, and the ambient temperature I anticipate.

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zelph
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Re: On sale

Postby zelph » Tue Apr 10, 2012 10:14 pm

All those things considered I can understand. Only time will tell if your design and proposed fuel will give and overnight burn.
"Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained" stove store = http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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ConnieD
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Re: On sale

Postby ConnieD » Tue Apr 10, 2012 10:29 pm

I want it to be backpackable.

I am convinced I can commit money to the project, now, after having seen so many successful designs and the tent/tipi sizes involved. I will find out if it is well spent.

The "small wood stoves for hunter's tents" thread helped. The designs of forum members helped even more.

The fact is, often hunter's are only in the sleep tent and in the cook tent, and then, put on really heavy clothing to sit still on a ridge, or in a treestand, or in a blind. If they tried to be active in that clothing, they would sweat.

Some hunters are active, walking the hills and mountains, then, pack out. Nearly all backpackers are active.

The fact is, I am most cozy comfortable at 40 F in my 20 F sleep system: 40 F at night is perfect.

50 F is better for light activity inside the shelter during the day.


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