Another quest for finding the perfect wood stove

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Motabobo
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2015 8:01 am

Another quest for finding the perfect wood stove

Postby Motabobo » Tue Jul 28, 2015 8:05 am

Situation: We are a family of three and I want to do some hot tenting in 0F temperature this winter without upgrading the whole family’s sleeping system (20F). I also do NOT want to wake up more than once during the night to refill the stove. This is critical, I want to fill the stove before going to bed, close the damper and go to sleep for as long as possible without getting cold (don’t forget the 20F difference, if not more…). I’ll cut my own firewood from where I’ll set up camp.

Current equipment: We all have 20F down sleeping bags with Exped Downmats (we also have ridgerests to go underneath as well). We’ll haul all the gear using snowshoes, pulks + backpacks.

Gear to acquire: tipi tent (6 or 8P I’m not sure yet) + woodstove

My research indicates that there seem to be 3 “class” of wood stoves (my own classification):
1. Class A, what I’d qualify as collapsible ultralight stoves, ranging from 1.5 to 10 lbs: Titanium Goat, Ruta Locura, Kifaru, Four Dog, Seek Outside, etc.
2. Class B, what I’d qualify as “light” stoves, ranging from 10 to I’ll say 36 lbs: Snowtrekker, Riley, Kni-Co, Sims, Four Dog, etc.
3. Class C, the heavy stoves, 36 lbs + which I haven’t researched much for obvious reasons.

Class A stoves seem to be able to keep the heat for 1h top. The only exception, is the Four Dog owner’s claim to be able to reach 3-4h. Anyone here experienced otherwise? Evidently, I’d be more than happy to spend the extra bucks on ultralight stove if they keep me warm for several hours, but that doesn’t seem to be the case. So I’m really looking about confirmation or invalidation here.

Class B stove seem to be the way to go. I’m looking for that delicate balance between weight and the amount of time the stove will be able to hold the heat at night. All things being equal, I’m theorizing it’s better to have a bigger stove than a smaller one, so I’ve calculated the Volume by total weight ratio (including pipes, damper & spark arrestor) and I cross-matched the result with each manufacturer’s burn time specifications if available. Putting aside all class A stoves, the clear winners are the Sims Sportmans, closely followed by the Kni-Co Alaska and Snowtrekker Large. This is followed by each company’s medium size stove. So I think it’s safe to assume it’s a matter of choosing between models, especially since Kni-Co actually manufactures both the Alaskan and Snowtrekker stoves. I’ve discarded the Sims Sportmans stove because I haven’t found a single review.

So:
1. Has anybody compared the two “brands”, I should rather say models between Kni-Co and Snowtrekker?
2. Can anyone comment on these stoves ability to hold the heath? I was told between 4-6h for both!
3. I’m concerned that both stoves do not have a baffle.
4. All the math & logic is pretty cool but did I miss anything, do you have a comment?
5. Ideally I could go for a smaller size stove for weight purposes, would that be possible in my scenario, say a Snowtrekker Medium or Kni-Co Alaskan Jr. (or even smaller)?
6. There has to be other design differences besides the Snowtrekker’s snow float legs. I mean the Snowtrekker Large goes for 24.5lbs including a shelf while the Kni-Co Alaskan standard package goes for 24 lbs…I’ll call Kni-Co to find out.

Thanks a lot for reading and commenting 

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zelph
Posts: 15768
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 1:53 pm

Re: Another quest for finding the perfect wood stove

Postby zelph » Tue Jul 28, 2015 11:41 pm

Class A stoves seem to be able to keep the heat for 1h top. The only exception, is the Four Dog owner’s claim to be able to reach 3-4h. Anyone here experienced otherwise? Evidently, I’d be more than happy to spend the extra bucks on ultralight stove if they keep me warm for several hours, but that doesn’t seem to be the case. So I’m really looking about confirmation or invalidation here.



I've tested fourdogs backpacking wood stoves and the quality is 1st class. He said he could boil 2 cups of water with 2 ounces of wood and he was right. I verified it using his stove.

If fourdog says a stove could reach 3-4 hrs, I would believe him. Follow his guidelines on prepping the stove and stacking method. Controlling oxygen is important for the long burn time.

I'm going to google the stoves you listed and observe design and capacity.

Thank you for stopping in and asking for our input :D
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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zelph
Posts: 15768
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 1:53 pm

Re: Another quest for finding the perfect wood stove

Postby zelph » Tue Jul 28, 2015 11:54 pm

3. I’m concerned that both stoves do not have a baffle.


If fourdog's stoves have a baffle go that route. Baffle is a must.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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zelph
Posts: 15768
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 1:53 pm

Re: Another quest for finding the perfect wood stove

Postby zelph » Tue Jul 28, 2015 11:56 pm

5. Ideally I could go for a smaller size stove for weight purposes, would that be possible in my scenario, say a Snowtrekker Medium or Kni-Co Alaskan Jr. (or even smaller)?


You've got a pulk so don't go smaller. keep your family comfortable...most important if you want them to continue going on adventures with you ;)
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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zelph
Posts: 15768
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 1:53 pm

Re: Another quest for finding the perfect wood stove

Postby zelph » Wed Jul 29, 2015 12:07 am

Wood is my goto fuel :D

http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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zelph
Posts: 15768
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 1:53 pm

Re: Another quest for finding the perfect wood stove

Postby zelph » Wed Jul 29, 2015 12:09 am

Go with a heavier stove and distribute the weight between 3 pulks.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/


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