Stove made from an ice bucket

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shingaling
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Stove made from an ice bucket

Post by shingaling » Sun Apr 03, 2011 1:49 pm

This is my first experience with a 'gasifier' stove, and it seems to have worked very well.

I started off with a stainless steel, double-walled ice bucket from a thrift store. The size is between a 1 quart paint can and a small coffee can.

14 holes at the base of the outer wall, each aligned with a ¼" hole in the firebucket. After hacking off the bottom of the outer layer, I cut a bunch of slots in the floor of the firebucket with an angle grinder.

Since I couldn't remove the firebucket to drill vent holes in the top, I used a cut-off wheel on a Dremel to cut rows of slots instead. 3 rings of staggered slots, 6 slots in each ring.

Stacked pencil-sized twigs in vertically, and top-lit it with a wad of drier lint and a few more twigs. Observations:
  • I understand now what is meant by a 'smokeless' burn. There will always be a little smoke of course, but far less than an open fire, and mostly when new fuel is being added to the fire and is lit from below.
  • At first I thought flames were just climbing up the walls of the firebucket, but on closer examination, it really did look like there were flames starting at the vents at the top. That's what's supposed to happen, isn't it? I was very excited to see that!
  • After 10 to 15 minutes of feeding twigs into the fire, the ash pile was no more than ¼ of a cup of fine powder, with only 1 or 2 pieces of charred wood about the size of a pencil eraser.
Haven't weighed it yet, but it's far too heavy and bulky for lugging around the woods. Great for the back yard, though, for those days when I want a little camp fire but don't want to mess with the fire pit. All I need to go with it is a pot stand and a cool name...The Ice Cube Kooker?...The Icey-Hot?...Fire'n'ice?...
Attachments
burning.jpg
firebucket_slots.jpg
firebucket_interior.jpg
firebucket_bottom.jpg
size_comparison.jpg
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realityguy
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Re: Stove made from an ice bucket

Post by realityguy » Sun Apr 03, 2011 8:19 pm

Hey..How do I keep my beer cold now? :evil: How come people have to take weird essential things and make woodstoves out of them..What's with the fascination? :evil:
Ah..Never mind..I just remembered I used a toilet plunger container for making one... :roll:


:lol: :lol: :lol:

Looks good!I have three Kamados(read..green eggs),the 3' barrel smoker,a couple hibatchis,a weber,and a metal firepit in the back yard..One more barbecue and I'll get a divorce probably with it... :mrgreen:
The views and opinions expressed by this person are his own and not the general consensus of others on this website.Realityguy

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zelph
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Re: Stove made from an ice bucket

Post by zelph » Sun Apr 03, 2011 9:03 pm

Wow, nice size for a ice bucket, never seen one that small. Nice find.

Do the vertical stack and top light and you'll getgood at it and never go back to bottom lighting. :D

As the heat rises with the woodgas it first comes in contact with air at the slits you made and "fire" occurs. All three necessaries are present for fire to happen. I'ts only air that is coming through the slits.

Nice job on cutting and slitting to make the stove work. :D

Nice thrill to have a stove perform well on your first try at burning in it :DBfire:

Thanks for sharing your moment of success :DB:
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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Ridgerunner
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Re: Stove made from an ice bucket

Post by Ridgerunner » Sun Apr 03, 2011 10:32 pm

Nice design shingaling. It shouldn't be too difficult to fabricate a pot support and grill cover. Will make a nice cooker for base camp and in the backyard. Put it in your car trunk and you can cook wherever ;)
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realityguy
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Re: Stove made from an ice bucket

Post by realityguy » Sun Apr 03, 2011 11:24 pm

That does look like a nice size for a nice filet mignon or burger..Heck..that's packable..just fill it up with goods and it doesn't waste much space/..looks like it burns well!
The views and opinions expressed by this person are his own and not the general consensus of others on this website.Realityguy

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shingaling
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Re: Stove made from an ice bucket

Post by shingaling » Mon Apr 04, 2011 7:50 am

I've only done one burn, but when I saw the flames coming out of the vents at the top of the firebucket, they were only coming out of the bottom ring of slots. I'm thinking I have at least one ring too many there. Are there any guidelines about the size/area/placement of vents at the top compared to the vents in the bottom?

If the stove is set up really efficiently, will there be more consistent flames or bigger flames coming out of the vents? I guess that would also depend on how much fuel is burning, and what the source of fuel is (ie hard wood, soft wood, pellets, etc.).
Any road followed precisely to its end leads precisely nowhere. Climb the mountain just a little bit to test that it's a mountain. From the top of the mountain, you cannot see the mountain.

realityguy
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Re: Stove made from an ice bucket

Post by realityguy » Mon Apr 04, 2011 10:24 am

I think you are going to have to hunt up a few more ice buckets and do some extensive testing to know for sure.. :lol:
You will also want to try the stove with a pot on top.That'll TOTALLY change the characteristics of the burn.Try another burn but physically hold a pot of cold water over the stove at varying levels above the rim to see what the optimal distance above the rim should be to maintain the best burn.You'll probably end up with about 1-1/2" from what I've done..but all stoves react differently.That may vary with the diameter and shape of the bottom of the pot also..figure the distance for the pot you would normally use...then build the potstand.
A grill would be nice..just something you could lay on the potstand for burgers and hotdogs.. ;) However..don't use corrugated aluminum..I tried that and suffered a meltdown.I use corrugated steel which even lowe's carries.ImageDry it off after use and it shouldn't get rusty.Stainless might be lighter but more costly unless you find something with holes already at a thrift store..
The views and opinions expressed by this person are his own and not the general consensus of others on this website.Realityguy

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ConnieD
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Re: Stove made from an ice bucket

Post by ConnieD » Mon Apr 04, 2011 11:32 am

The ratio of openings at the bottom to the openings at the top would be worth knowing.

Maybe someone has already worked that out?

Maybe you are the one to work that out (using inespensive cans of the diameter and height you are interested, or, different diameters and height if that makes a difference. I suspect it would, because volume is a factor.

I think efficiency is in the flame pattern, and, is demonstrated by the amount of wood left over after the burn.

Are there chunks of unburned wood? Not efficient.

Are there chunks of incompletely burned wood? Not so efficient.

Is the wood consumed to a fine ash? Efficient.

If I saw a wood stove with blue flames, I would believe it is really "reburning" the wood gasses. I have looked at the diagrams. I just do not believe "reburning" of wood gasses is happening.

I am not at all convinced this "design concept" ever re-burns wood gasses.

I would think the aim of having the holes is "optimum" air intake and air flow for complete combustion as opposed to incomplete combustion.

JollyRogers
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Re: Stove made from an ice bucket

Post by JollyRogers » Mon Apr 04, 2011 2:05 pm

Blue flame is an indicator of complete combustion or no soot. You cannot get this with normal wood in a wood stove. Wood gas or wood vapors are chock full of soot and creosote, which actually makes the wood gas flammable.
Typically, only burning vapor or gas allows complete combustion which creates a blue flame.

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ConnieD
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Re: Stove made from an ice bucket

Post by ConnieD » Mon Apr 04, 2011 2:08 pm

I know. That is why I don't believe "wood gas" stoves are real.

I like my Woodgaz folding wood stove, but I don't think it is more than a nice wood stove for backpacking.

Nevertheless, I do think efficiency is a worthy goal. I like having only fine ash at the end with my MK1-UL.

It is a "toss up" for me, which of these two wood stoves for backpacking I like better.

I am surprised to read at YouTube reviews, some backpackers, particularly thru-hikers, don't like the amount of time involved with the wood stove. Maybe they are trying to have a big fire? I know I use a smaller fire for a cooking fire. Maybe thru-hikers are in such a hurry, they do not take in the experience the same as other backpackers?

I happen to think food preparation, while backpacking, should be enjoyable.

The backpacking stove is a major factor.

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