small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Here's the place you can post your favorite wood burning stove and also information on how to build and where to get supplies.
realityguy
Posts: 5945
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 2:20 am
Location: slightly north of Seattle,WA

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby realityguy » Tue May 25, 2010 8:34 pm

Back in town..personally..I don't think any stove that small will hold a fire/heat all night..That's really pushing the limit because the fuel pieces are just not big enough that go into the thing.I would think a 1-1/2 to 2 hour burn may be a maximum burn time.
I do need to scan through this thread..don't take my post as out of line or a repeat.. :roll: ..just got home and really haven't had time to even unpack yet..just checking to see what's been happening...
I think everything in a smaller stove will be a trade off for other features..long burns=weight because a solid stove that retains heat needs the bulk of heavier steel.Air dampening =reduced heat..just that it will last longer.Foldability= air loss and not air tight.Lightweight metal=possible warpage.Smaller fuel chamber= use of smaller fuel that won't burn as long.
As long as people understand those things..the idea is to get a compromise that will give the best of all options and features...for the"structure"(tent,cabin,trailer,outhouse) you plan to use it in.
The views and opinions expressed by this person are his own and not the general consensus of others on this website.Realityguy

User avatar
zelph
Posts: 15785
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 1:53 pm

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby zelph » Tue May 25, 2010 8:42 pm

It would be good to know if Turk has tested a few stainless steel stoves to give him the qualifications to state whether or not it warps in excess to make them usable.

For a hunters tent the stove has to be of the smallest size or else it will drive you out of the tent because of excess heat. I don't really see the small stoves retaining hot coals through the night. Maybe........if your good at stokin it properly, need lots of practice for that.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

User avatar
ConnieD
Posts: 2041
Joined: Sat Dec 19, 2009 10:53 pm
Location: Montana
Contact:

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby ConnieD » Tue May 25, 2010 9:10 pm

A hunter had a small wood stove in his small "hunter's trailer" he made out of stainless steel.

He did have a small trailer, maybe 13' overall.

The stove he made must have been 6 x 6 x 12 inches. He put dry twigs from near the bottom of the tree trunk in it.

That stove was so hot, he had everything open, including the front door, and he was roasting standing in the front door entryway.

I was standing outside and I felt warmed by that wood stove. I just had to see it. That's it. 3" stove pipe, and damper 18" above the stove, which reminds me: that stove maker told me the damper had to be about 18" above the stove. One design in the thread, the one I have liked: the TiGoat cylinder stove has the damper at the joining of the stove and the stove pipe.

realityguy
Posts: 5945
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 2:20 am
Location: slightly north of Seattle,WA

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby realityguy » Tue May 25, 2010 9:27 pm

Most trailers have 1-1/2" of fiberglass insulation and are pretty airtight..In fact they are supposed to be vented to outside combustion air..for obvious reasons.
Starting up a fire of small twigs is fine and dandy and will get awful hot,too hot..but won't hold much heat for any long duration of time.
The views and opinions expressed by this person are his own and not the general consensus of others on this website.Realityguy

User avatar
zelph
Posts: 15785
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 1:53 pm

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby zelph » Wed May 26, 2010 11:06 am

The stove he made must have been 6 x 6 x 12 inches. He put dry twigs from near the bottom of the tree trunk in it.


That goes to show a stove of that size would be overkill for a small hunters tent......not really :D just feed it slowly. I never use the damper on my wood burning stove.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

realityguy
Posts: 5945
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 2:20 am
Location: slightly north of Seattle,WA

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby realityguy » Wed May 26, 2010 12:01 pm

I think a stove that is 6x6x16-18 would allow a couple longer larger pieces of wood,thereby allowing a longer burn from one end of the stove to the other.A person could light a small fire,gather it near the front door of the stove and place the longer fuel on top,allowing the fire to burn from the front to the back over time.
Also..that way a person could have a variable cooking pad on top with a higher heat area over the fire area and a simmer mode over where it's not burning directly.
Sideways opening stoves suck..they just don't work well.They are hard to light,hard to feed(without fire all over the floor) and don't draw well.Placement of a damper in the pipe goes would depend also on the length of the firebox.
Years ago there was a company called Orley..might still be in business..that produced round stoves made of 1/8" steel pipe with a diameter of 12-16" that didn't need firebrick because the round sides swelled equally eliminating distortion and breaking of welds, even if the stoves burned cherry red from the heat.orlleys didn't use any kind of interlocking door.gasket setup,just metal against flat metal;dampering them all the way shut still let just enough air flow to keep the fire going inside...They made some stoves without glass..so it took knowledge of the stove to control the burn rather than the visual aid of a glass front.They always opened from one flat end,even the ones with glass fronts..
I would think finding a piece of 1/16"-3/32"(whatever gauge that is) stainless steel pipe in a 5-6" diameter,about 18" long,having a stovepipe end connection welded to the top near one end and a square maximum opening door(whatever the largest possible square could be with straight places for hinges,latchplate,and "contained" ash area on the bottom,2 or 3 ..1" holes for vent near the lower portion of the door with a slide damper would be the best option..four screw on "bolt" legs about 10" long and the stovepipe sections could be fit inside for easy packing..about the size of a normal rolled tent that could be strapped under a backpack..would make a nice tent stove option.The flat 3- 4" wide cookplate could be bolted to nuts welded on top..as the legs are attached..making both items able to be detached.
I imagine someone is already making that..It's too nice an idea and the pipe is too easy to work with not to have been used already.Just weld some flat plating pieces on the front and back..no long flat corners to mess with..and pretty much airtight already!
Daren..get right on one of those,will you? :roll: ..and can you give me an idea of the weight of that before building one?Just curious...I don't need one..

:lol: :lol:

(orleys are still being sold on craigs here and there...http://sacramento.craigslist.org/for/1758713269.html)
The views and opinions expressed by this person are his own and not the general consensus of others on this website.Realityguy

User avatar
ConnieD
Posts: 2041
Joined: Sat Dec 19, 2009 10:53 pm
Location: Montana
Contact:

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby ConnieD » Wed May 26, 2010 12:42 pm

I have seen an actual "sheepherder's" wood stove like that, and about those dimensions.

Maybe that is why it was like that: to burn the wood from front-to-back.

Is a baffle required to get it to burn front to back, or, only the adjustable vent holes in the front?


Zelph,

I think Turk was referring to the .010 inch thick stainless steel construction of the Kifaru wood stove mentioned further up in the thread.


realityguy,

I definitely think I could use that all-purpose Orley stove for backpacking. It looks like a bed, too. Keep you toasty warm!
At least the foreshortened view in this photograph makes it look like an old-fashioned wrought iron bedstead.

Image
Last edited by ConnieD on Wed May 26, 2010 6:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.

realityguy
Posts: 5945
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 2:20 am
Location: slightly north of Seattle,WA

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby realityguy » Wed May 26, 2010 1:20 pm

Orley's had a smaller plain version called(you guessed it!) the sheepherder.The stove was made to heat 600 square feet and had one end(and damper on the front not on the back end) facing the room,18" depth,no glass.I had one to heat my garage..or to heat a portion of it.Orley's flaw is that they did use more wood than a full airtight with firebrick stove and you had to add it more often.The firebox was generous and easy to load though.
The orleys did come in several models with a lot of ornate cast iron rose bushes and other crap that added nothing to the efficiency but looked nice to some people(gaudy to me!).I did have a second orley that we could hook up to a fireplace with a back flue pipe and fireplace cover that we used on rental homes with fireplaces..just didn't have all the fancy junk..a plain jane sideways model with an 18" firebed.It was made to heat 800 sq feet because it had a draft damper at each end..and a glass front(ceramic glass behind plate glass to watch the fire)like the one pictured...
A baffle is not needed as far as I know.The vent damper on the door controls the air which controls the red glowing embers on the front edge of the unburned wood fuel as it burns from front to back.I think that should be sufficient for a good burn.
A damper in a stove pipe would control the draw of the pipe better and maybe slow down the burn if the front damper won't tighten down enough to do so.I would think a damper in a stove pipe would be very susceptable to accumulating a large amount of soot and creosote and have to be continually removed and cleaned..a messy job in a tent!
I've heated all my homes about 95% with woodstoves for the last 30 years or so....When you are in the business of home remodeling with access to lots of firewood from framing and demolition (clean bone dry ones) scraps on the job..it just doesn't make sense to pay for other unnecessary sources of heat "on the grid"... ;)
The views and opinions expressed by this person are his own and not the general consensus of others on this website.Realityguy

User avatar
DarenN
Posts: 2816
Joined: Wed Feb 06, 2008 11:46 am
Location: Surrey, B.C. Canada

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby DarenN » Wed May 26, 2010 3:28 pm

i'll check around at the shop and see if i can find a likely looking piece of s/s tubing. i think it would be a fun project to build.
i think i would like 8" round though. 6" just seems too small to me.
"I'd rather be happy than right." Slartibartfast

User avatar
ConnieD
Posts: 2041
Joined: Sat Dec 19, 2009 10:53 pm
Location: Montana
Contact:

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby ConnieD » Wed May 26, 2010 6:20 pm

My property is "all-the-way" off-grid. I have 4 solar panels, propane and a wood stove for the 'hunter's trailer". The nearest neighbor is the beekeeper 3/4 mile as-the-crow-flies down the ridge and across the road from the east edge of the property.

There are no other neighbors on Chief Mountain Scenic Highway, only "the rich man's house" near the beekeeper. "Rich man's house" is a local expression for a brand new house no one lives in, and probably never will, once he tries a "Montana winter".

The "rich man's house" is a house built wrong for Montana: too many windows, vaulted ceilings, impossible to heat no matter how much money you have.

I am working on getting my structural materials up on the property.

I may drop off the map, for awhile, I am so eager to get up there.

What was I saying, oh yes, I have little dry twigs practically everywhere up there. The birch trees down the eastern edge of the property give way to the open meadows on my 20 acres and go down the ridge into the 10 acres and USA Trust land and up to the crest of the ridge to USA Trust land, consisting of Old Growth Engelmann Spruce. Up the ridge there is "common mint" everywhere on the forest floor. I am on the shoulder of the ridge, my property includes a little North side and more property is on the South side of the shoulder of the ridge. Well, I tried to describe the lay of the land there in words. Anyway, no lack of little dry twigs at the base of trees and somewhat larger stuff on the ground. No logs on the ground, someone did some illegal logging up there on my 20 acres.

Twigs, got twigs. Bigger stuff, got bigger stuff.

I have no interest in cutting my trees. I love them. I think I may hug them, when I get there! :mrgreen:

I said that, just to be annoying. Many Montana-people really hate "tree huggers".

DarenN, ...a round wood stove? It would have to burn presto logs.


Return to “WOOD BURNING STOVES”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest