small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Here's the place you can post your favorite wood burning stove and also information on how to build and where to get supplies.
User avatar
ConnieD
Posts: 2042
Joined: Sat Dec 19, 2009 10:53 pm
Location: Montana
Contact:

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby ConnieD » Thu Jan 27, 2011 11:50 am

Since you have no top peak vents, the two zipper doors for ventilation, the placement of the stove jacks and the top vents isn't what I want to see.

I just want to get an idea how the stove pipe and the stove jack is positioned, relative to the center pole.

There has been some concern, in the forum, about the movement of the tipi in wind pulling over the stovepipe.

I would think if properly pitched, that would not be a problem. However, snow build-up might make the difference.

When I am inside a tent I can usually get the snow off the tent by lightly tapping the sidewalls. I have, on occasion, had to go outside to brush the snow off the tent.

I would think a tipi would shed snow well.

High wind could be a problem. Is it? Have experience?

I have noticed some stove jacks have a roll-down velcro closure and others have a velcro patch for when the stove is not in use, also. Do you have that?

kevin_t
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 12:36 am

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby kevin_t » Thu Jan 27, 2011 2:03 pm

We do have a peak vent, it's just that it is either the peak vent or the stove jack. Make sense? It's close to the center pole, within 6 inches. It is better that way since fabric will have less movement in snow or wind.


Wind - They hold up very well in the wind. I've had BBQ grills blow over, and dome tents blow away without causing an issue on a large tipi. Now the windward side does compress (FWIW, I've been in dome tents where poles inverted in high winds). This compression isn't that big of an issue but it can be mitigated by using what we call "Faux Structure" which essentially is using a lightweight low stretch cord to go from the top of the tipi to the tie out on the windward side. They have been in winds that will knock over a strong person, and as long as it's staked down well you are fine.

Tipi's shed snow well especially the dry stuff, however it can buildup around the base where it does not have a place to go. This pretty much requires going outside to clear it off. What does work to mitigate this is a small sidewall. The small sidewall acts essentially as an eve, so the snow moves off the tipi, until there is enough snow for it to not flow off, then it builds up.

With our tipi's you can pitch them up a bit, making use of the sodcloth as a sidewall. In fact, in most conditions I prefer this approach, because bugs aren't a big issue and then I auto tension the tie outs as well. If bugs or wind blown debris (sand , snow) were an issue, I would bring the tipi down to the ground. FWIW, the two environments usually mitigate each others problems.

Kevin

User avatar
ConnieD
Posts: 2042
Joined: Sat Dec 19, 2009 10:53 pm
Location: Montana
Contact:

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby ConnieD » Thu Jan 27, 2011 2:23 pm

I have seen dome tents blow to North Dakota, probably. Just take off, in flight!

This is Montana, where I am.

At "Indian Days" in Browning, MT, the Blackfeet Warrior Society tipi is tied down with a 1" stout rope to several wood stakes driven deep in the ground. At least, after it fell over on two old men and me. My "hard head" saved their lives, no doubt. Well, one was standing in the door. Two 6-7" diameter tipi poles hit me centerline on the head, one after the other. One man rolled off his metal chair (we were sitting outside) to the ground. I remained sitting upright in the metal chair, lower legs bracing the metal chair legs, so the poles didn't roll off and hit the other older man.

That is another time.

You have had your tipi's in a stiff wind? with good results?

Have you had the wood stove and stove pipe in your tipi in a stiff wind?

I ask, but I don't plan on using it on the prairie. I would use it in the mountains, where the wind won't hit you from every direction.

I ask, because these are questions I have not seen answered. I hope you don't mind.

Is your tipi symmetrical or asymmetrical?
Last edited by ConnieD on Thu Jan 27, 2011 3:02 pm, edited 2 times in total.

User avatar
ConnieD
Posts: 2042
Joined: Sat Dec 19, 2009 10:53 pm
Location: Montana
Contact:

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby ConnieD » Thu Jan 27, 2011 2:57 pm

I posted this on another page, here.

It appears this tent-tipi could have both: top vents and top stove pipe. Maybe, not.

inside view
Image

outside view
Image
ref: http://www.wildsidesystems.com/

kevin_t
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 12:36 am

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby kevin_t » Thu Jan 27, 2011 3:17 pm

In the spring in the SW it gets pretty windy. Windy enough to blow over vehicles. A tester estimated winds at 60 one time, and said they could not stand up in the wind. They were not using a pipe.

I've had large tipi's up with pipes in winds strong enough to send nearby dome tents flying.

They do require good staking down for high winds, but our normal stakes have worked fine in high winds.

it is asymmetrical. Steeper near the door, longer in the back as shown in this photo. The large tipi is about a 10" difference.
Image

sudden
Posts: 1058
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 5:33 pm

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby sudden » Thu Jan 27, 2011 5:48 pm

I like the look of it. I know we keep asking for photos... but... do you have any vids of the setup?
"People are not persuaded by what we say, but rather by what they understand."

User avatar
ConnieD
Posts: 2042
Joined: Sat Dec 19, 2009 10:53 pm
Location: Montana
Contact:

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby ConnieD » Fri Jan 28, 2011 10:14 am

I like the look of it.

I like an asymmetrical tipi.

What are the dimensions? How tall?

What is the footprint maximum length and width?

kevin_t
Posts: 16
Joined: Wed Jan 26, 2011 12:36 am

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby kevin_t » Fri Jan 28, 2011 11:33 am

No videos of setup. I will put one up this spring. Setup is simple, once you have done it a couple times. We provide a utility rope that makes it pretty easy getting correct dimensions

Dimensions, one in the photo is a 6 person
6 Person 7'6" tall , 14 * 13 footprint
4 person 6'10" tall , 12 * 11 footprint
2 person 5'9" tall 10'6" * 9'' 10" footprint

In reality, the 2 person can sleep 4 people, cramped like most tents. For 2 it is very comfy for gear and stove.

Here are a couple more stove pictures, newer prototypes
Image

Specs on these stoves are as follows , weights are approx. Should be very close within once or two.
Dimensions Inside 7 / 8.5 / 12
Volume 720 Cubic inches, by digging down 3 " you would be over 1000 Cu inches, 6 inch hole would be 1300 volume approx.

Weight No Bottom , Stove an stainless 8 ft pipe 48 - 52 ounces
Weight w/ bottom , stainless pipe 56 - 60 ounces

Weight no bottom Titanium Pipe 40 -44 ounces
w /bottom 58 - 52 ounces

TItanium
Weight not bottom , ti pipe 22 - 27 ounces
weight w bottom + ti pipe 25 - 30 ounces

Kevin

User avatar
zelph
Posts: 15822
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 1:53 pm

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby zelph » Fri Jan 28, 2011 11:49 am

Kevin, super nice that you stopped by to give us all the specifics on your great looking products. I'm a big fan of the teepee design. I have lots of silnylon for a DIY project that will come about this summer. I'm sure someone will have their doubts :mrgreen:
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

User avatar
ConnieD
Posts: 2042
Joined: Sat Dec 19, 2009 10:53 pm
Location: Montana
Contact:

Re: small wood stoves for "hunter's tents"

Postby ConnieD » Fri Jan 28, 2011 1:44 pm

Kevin, Here are a couple more stove pictures, newer prototypes
Image
Specs on these stoves are as follows , weights are approx. Should be very close within once or two.
Dimensions Inside 7 / 8.5 / 12
Volume 720 Cubic inches, by digging down 3 " you would be over 1000 Cu inches, 6 inch hole would be 1300 volume approx.


Maybe set on top one of these? :|
Image
ref: http://www.tentipi.com/index.php?id=164

I like that the two-piece construction you have works well.

When I started mountain climbing, we had to hike in and set up a base camp.

The equipment was heavier than what is available, now, so we shared the weight: you carry the stove, I'll carry the cookkit. We divided up the weight of the food. Like that.

If the top is collapsible, then, the weight carried could be divided.


Kevin, Have you looked at these online calculators for intake, firebox volume, stove pipe diameter and length: viewtopic.php?f=60&t=4873 Those were worked out for a smoker, but if you ignore the special features of a smoker, the numbers should work out right. No?
Last edited by ConnieD on Fri Jan 28, 2011 1:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.


Return to “WOOD BURNING STOVES”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests