"survival challenge" anyone?

Useful information that may come in handy in an emergency situation. It can be hiking related or any other area of every day life situations. Icestorms, huricanes, tornados, floods etc.
realityguy
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Re: "survival challenge" anyone?

Postby realityguy » Mon Apr 25, 2011 4:49 pm

Well, I did not get to the second pack :oops:


Yeah..it appears you might have a hard time firing up an alcohol stove without fuel... :lol:
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zelph
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Re: "survival challenge" anyone?

Postby zelph » Mon Apr 25, 2011 9:36 pm

realityguy wrote:
Well, I did not get to the second pack :oops:


Yeah..it appears you might have a hard time firing up an alcohol stove without fuel... :lol:


I'd better have some in the other pack...............now let me see..........where did I put the other pack :lol:

I just asked my wife where it is and if it has alcohol. It's in the bedroom and no, there is no alcohol :oops:

Have no fear!!!!! all is well...................there is alcohol in the trunk of the car with another stove and MountainHouse meals. Were safe to go :D

Maybe cadyak is out surviving as we speak :o

I live downwind of a nuke power plant also( Byron) We live in the NewMadrid fault line also(earthquake) in the 1800's was the last quake, channge the course of the Mississippi river and shook the church bells on the east coast :o Oh My, it's going to be a big one someday :mrgreen:
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

realityguy
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Re: "survival challenge" anyone?

Postby realityguy » Mon Apr 25, 2011 9:42 pm

Were safe to go :D


As long as you don't forget to grab the third pack....Around here it could be St. Helens or Rainier erupting,Boeing and computer businesses in the middle of a war zone,being in the middle of one of the major west coast tsunamis and earthquake areas(or bombed seaports), or basically things that don't allow you time to [b]go back and get that third pack[/b]... ;)
That's why I want one small bag with everything in it...and still under 10lbs... :roll:
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ConnieD
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Re: "survival challenge" anyone?

Postby ConnieD » Tue Apr 26, 2011 12:42 am

A complete "ToGo" outfit, whatever it is, is important.

I used to do mountainclimbing having a backpack and a waist pack, keeping the waist pack either always ON or "at hand".

The waist pack had the absolute essentials.

This arrangement worked well, because the pack waist-belt and chest-strap had to be undone, for safety, for stream crossings. That way, the absolute essentials for getting your clothing cold and wet were in the waterproof liner waist pack in addition to what little you had in a your pockets.

Because I lived in "earthquake country" 18+ years, I had the "earthquake" box at home and an "earthquake" box at the job, plus a ready-to-go bag for walking or for transportation.

In the 1989 Earthquake, in San Francisco, which was much worse than reported in the news, I had time to load more in the vehicle and it was that experience made me think more about what more I could have all the time in my vehicle.

I paid $50 to "borrow" a Honda 90 motorcycle to find a route out, there was that much debris on the roads or roads that were broken. I paid $300 to purchase an old car so I could get away: I went to relatives two states away.

Here, I am more secure.

I keep doing this kind of provisioning because it provides a sense of self-reliance I like.

I found YouTube video showing how to make an effective lightweight shelter, in advance.



The design and the adjustable tie-outs utilizing elastic provide a "taut pitch".

The newest "heetsheets" are not nearly so "noisy" as the older mylar used, but "earplugs" or a small radio can make it easier to sleep thru the constant noise of the older mylar "rescue sheets".
Last edited by ConnieD on Tue Apr 26, 2011 12:08 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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ConnieD
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Re: "survival challenge" anyone?

Postby ConnieD » Tue Apr 26, 2011 1:01 am

Here is one of those "space rescue" blankets configured as a "sleeping bag".



This points up the value, or necessity, of having a warm "beanie" hat and a face mask.

There are balaclavas, however I like the air-warming facemasks, either PSolar.EX facemask or PolarWrap Warm Air Mask, Full Head Cover, or Exchanger II and a warm "beanie" hat.

Because warm breath "lost" is losing your body warmth to the cold air and body warmth is used to warm every in-breath of cold air, these specialized facemasks and face wraps help conserve your body warmth, and, preheat the cold air as well.

These small things require so little effort to carry, and, do a maximum job for helping you keep warm.

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ConnieD
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Re: "survival challenge" anyone?

Postby ConnieD » Tue Apr 26, 2011 3:48 am

Here is a fisherman, who made a plastic bag shelter.

He also had a mylar sheet, and, duct tape.

He actually stayed out overnight. He shows the problems about this shelter.


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ConnieD
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Re: "survival challenge" anyone?

Postby ConnieD » Tue Apr 26, 2011 3:52 am

Here is a hunter.

He demonstrates a shelter some hunters use.

If he had reflective material inside, and, a small fire in front this could be cozy warm.

I know I need to be lying down to get a good rest. But here it is:



I found out I can sleep sitting up. I didn't know I could do that, but I could.

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zelph
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Re: "survival challenge" anyone?

Postby zelph » Tue Apr 26, 2011 11:46 am

Good videos, lots to be learned from others. thanks Connie.

A simple, large bag will make for a quick and easy shelter. Carry one in you car for emergency.

They can be purchased single from moving companies.

http://www.uline.com/BL_158/Mattress-Ba ... KgodJzD6AA

http://www.uline.com/BL_120/Poly-Covers
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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ConnieD
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Re: "survival challenge" anyone?

Postby ConnieD » Tue Apr 26, 2011 11:50 am

The mattress bag is at least 4 mil plastic I got from U-Haul for a mattress for storage.

The new mattress I purchased had one.

I carried a 4 mil plastic tarp cut to 8' x 10' and set the grommets in three layers cut-to-fit myself, as a requirement for a 10-day hike in Washington State "North Cascades" with the girl scouts. It was heavy, but it works.

One hard rain night, I set it up as a lean-to against a boulder and the girls who had thin-plastic sheeting that was torn, of course, got out of the rain and we slept well with out head near the boulder with the plastic tucked under and our feet toward the low end of the lean-to, all of us in there lined up in our sleeping bags like sardines.

In spite of the printed list, I was the only one who brought the required 4 mil plastic.

Thank you, it wasn't easy finding good video. I like a reflective tarp and a bivy bag for shelter, myself.

I figure, if I am hiking "out-and-back" on a park trail, I should be at least that much prepared if necessary to stay overnight or more. This provision, gives me the freedom to "explore" for mountain lakes, waterfalls and isolated "wilderness" photogenic views away from the road, either with or without a camera.

My smallest "sleep system" to avoid common occurring hypothermia includes an insulative mat or mattress and at least a 40-degree F rated synthetic sleeping bag. The bivy bag and a really good insulative down-filled air mattress bring the rating down to 30-degrees F or even 20-degrees F by adding a reflective small fire, I can demonstrate packs well into a day pack with room for a "complete kitchen" with food and provision for safe drinking water.

The product I would "like to see" is a lightweight 60 denier maximum nylon tarp with one reflective side inside, with tie-out loops. (Maybe made from fancy kite material?)

By the way, I like your new "Soloist Kitchen" you are adding to your store this next week.

Are you going to show us what is in that pack, in the photo, maybe?
Last edited by ConnieD on Tue Apr 26, 2011 7:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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ConnieD
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Re: "survival challenge" anyone?

Postby ConnieD » Tue Apr 26, 2011 3:26 pm

Wish answered:

Image

The manufacturer http://www.sti.nasa.gov/tto/Spinoff2006/ch_9.html will print to specification.

The USMC has a marathon race, and gave out these tear-off Heatsheets.

I would like Multicam, 3-color Desert, Woodland.

Next, original Mossy Oak Breakup, Realtree Hardwoods, more, more.

There it is. I would buy so many of these.

I want it in 8' x 10' and a 5'2" x 9' minimalist "monk's tarp".


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