At-home cooking

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churro
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At-home cooking

Postby churro » Fri Mar 06, 2015 3:32 pm

Just thought I'd share some of my favorite recipes for cooking at home, and give you a place to do the same. Might as well share some suggestions for making these recipes work in camp, too.

I'll start with "rapid-fried lamb slices". I found this in some chinese cookbook from the 80's that my mom brought home from an asian cooking class. Since I raise meat lambs, it caught my eye, but it works great with venison, beef, pork, rabbit, squirrel, chicken and just about anything that runs through your yard or gets hit by a car. Just don't tell me about it if you use dog or cat- I don't want to know. I like this recipe for weeknights when I haven't planned ahead. Thawing meat completely in the microwave always seems to partly cook some of it. I partly thaw it in the microwave, so no overcooked parts, and it's still firm enough to slice thin, plus it's ready quickly.

10 oz lean lamb (or any mammal or bird)
12 green onions, sliced, or 1/2 onion, sliced thin
1 tbsp soy sauce
1/2 tsp salt
1 tbsp dry sherry (or any booze you have on hand- beer, wine, gin, whisky, hard cider, homemade wine, whatever)
1/2 tbsp ground black pepper
2 tsp cornstarch
1 clove garlic, crushed or minced
1 tbsp sesame oil or chili oil (or mix them to achieve the spiciness you want)
1 tbsp vinegar

Slice the meat as thin as possible (best done when the meat is partly frozen, kind of slushy- put it in the freezer for 30 minutes, or, if frozen, partly thaw in the microwave or refrigerator). Mix everything but the sesame or chili oil and vinegar. Set aside. Heat a cast iron skillet or wok (not non-stick! TOO HOT!) with some oil in it until the oil is smoking well. Add the meat mixture, stir briefly (like 30 seconds, just until the juices are not bloody), add the sesame/chili oil and vinegar, stir briefly. Serve hot.

The key is a HOT pan (so use an oil with a high smoke point) and brief, fast stir-fry cooking. It'll come out very tender. If you do not have the pan hot enough it'll be either tough or undercooked. If you double the recipe, cook it in batches so it cooks nice and fast.

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zelph
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Re: At-home cooking

Postby zelph » Fri Mar 06, 2015 4:05 pm

A little research told me the canola is a high temp oil.

Just don't tell me about it if you use dog or cat- I don't want to know.
:lol: My mother had an interesting childhood story about cats being sold as rabbits :o

Your recipe sound delicious. thanks for starting this thread. :D

My roast in the bread machine was basic and worked well. Used PAM on the pan for easy cleanup.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

churro
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Re: At-home cooking

Postby churro » Fri Mar 06, 2015 6:10 pm

Alright, Here's another one meant to go with the rapid-fried lamb slices. "Hot and Sour cabbage". I like to serve the meat on top of the cabbage in a big platter or bowl, then provide bowls of rice that it can be spooned over. Steamed broccoli goes nicely, too, as well as fresh basil or mint. If yo want to limit the prep time, use a bag of coleslaw mix instead of a head of cabbage. (side note: cole slaw mix will dehydrate nicely and makes a good addition to ramen or any other soup).

1 head of cabbage
2 bell peppers (any color)
2 tbsp soy sauce
2 tbsp vinegar (I use homemade apple cider vinegar, made from our apple trees)
2 tbsp sugar, agave nectar or honey
1 tsp salt
3 tbsp oil
several dried jalepenos or a packet of cayenne from the pizza place
ground black pepper to taste
1 tbsp sesame oil

Slice the peppers and cabbage thin. In a small bowl, mix the soy sauce, vunegar, sugar and salt. Preheat a wok or skillet (if doing this with the lamb, do the cabbage first, put onto serving platter, then do the meat in the same skillet). Add oil to the skillet, then add the jalepenos or cayenne. After a few seconds, add the cabbage and bell peppers. Stir fry for a minute or two. Add the sauce mixture and stir well. Place in serving platter, drizzle with sesame oil and serve hot or cold.

churro
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Re: At-home cooking

Postby churro » Fri Mar 06, 2015 6:34 pm

And here's how I make homemade bouillon cubes. Sure, it's a lot of work, but a big batch will provide a huge supply. Count on it taking a weekend:

Make a big batch of stock. I use bones and scraps left over from other meals, as well as any meat that's left in the freezer when butchering season rolls around. It's actually best when you mix a bunch of different types of critters. Roast the bones, if you want, at 375 for a 20-30 minutes. Put in a large stockpot, add a couple broken up carrots and celery sticks, an onion, halved, skin on, some peppercorns, cloves and a few sprigs of thyme, maybe some parsley. Cover (and then some) with cold water. Bring to a boil slowly (I use a 5 gallon stockpot and just put it on high- slow enough), skimming any scum that rises for the first hour or so. Bring to a boil too fast and the scum gets incorporated into the stock, making it cloudy. That doesn't bother me much, but those proteins will give you gas, and that does bother me (and my wife). Simmer 3 hours to overnight. Add boiling water as necessary to keep everything covered. Turn off the heat and let sit for a half hour or so, then use some vinyl tubing to siphon out the liquid, leaving the fat behind (my own innovation- easier than skimming fat). Now you have excellent stock with no fat in it.

Boil it down to 1/4 original volume or so. You can pretty much bring it to a rolling boil and leave it alone for this part. Transfer to a smaller pot, then continue boiling until the bubbles look like boiling fudge or caramel, and give of little or no steam when they break. At this stage you have to watch it carefully and reduce the heat so it doesn't scorch. When it gets to the point where a few drops dribbled onto a chilled plate resemble hard rubber, you're done. It'll be about 1/8 the original volume. Transfer to a stainless bowl and chill it well. It should be hard and rubbery when chilled. If it's not, boil it down some more.

Now float the stainless bowl on hot water for a few seconds to unmold, then slip the rubbery mass onto a cutting board. Cut into 1/2" cubes, shake in a bag with some cornstarch (to keep them from sticking together) and place in a mason jar covered with cloth. Put the jar in the back of the refrigerator. The cubes will continue to dry out and will keep indefinitely. Once they are thoroughly dry, they will keep fine at room temp. 1 cube makes 1 cup stock. Remember, there's no salt in them, so plan for that. Also, they take a little simmering to reconstitute fully, but they taste MUCH bette than storebought bouillon cubes. 1 batch lasts me over a year. And it makes excellent wood glue, though it will attract mice.

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zelph
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Re: At-home cooking

Postby zelph » Sat Mar 07, 2015 6:57 pm

churro wrote:Alright, Here's another one meant to go with the rapid-fried lamb slices. "Hot and Sour cabbage". I like to serve the meat on top of the cabbage in a big platter or bowl, then provide bowls of rice that it can be spooned over. Steamed broccoli goes nicely, too, as well as fresh basil or mint. If yo want to limit the prep time, use a bag of coleslaw mix instead of a head of cabbage. (side note: cole slaw mix will dehydrate nicely and makes a good addition to ramen or any other soup).

1 head of cabbage
2 bell peppers (any color)
2 tbsp soy sauce
2 tbsp vinegar (I use homemade apple cider vinegar, made from our apple trees)
2 tbsp sugar, agave nectar or honey
1 tsp salt
3 tbsp oil
several dried jalepenos or a packet of cayenne from the pizza place
ground black pepper to taste
1 tbsp sesame oil

Slice the peppers and cabbage thin. In a small bowl, mix the soy sauce, vunegar, sugar and salt. Preheat a wok or skillet (if doing this with the lamb, do the cabbage first, put onto serving platter, then do the meat in the same skillet). Add oil to the skillet, then add the jalepenos or cayenne. After a few seconds, add the cabbage and bell peppers. Stir fry for a minute or two. Add the sauce mixture and stir well. Place in serving platter, drizzle with sesame oil and serve hot or cold.


This one I'll do on Monday :D

If yo want to limit the prep time, use a bag of coleslaw mix instead of a head of cabbage. (side note: cole slaw mix will dehydrate nicely and makes a good addition to ramen or any other soup).



The bag of coleslaw is the way I will go...I like "easy" :D
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

churro
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Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2015 12:00 pm

Re: At-home cooking

Postby churro » Mon Mar 09, 2015 10:30 pm

Ok, I really hope somebody reads this post, because it will improve his or her quality of life, and it takes like 43 seconds to make. I call it "New England Nuoc mam". It's roughly based on a recipe my mom got from some lady who runs an asian food market, but I use real maple syrup instead of sugar syrup. My brother's father-in-law makes syrup, and it is definitely best made with that, but "Uncle Mike's" from Sam's club works, too. Don't use fake syrup- trust me.

Equal parts apple cider vinegar (I use homemade, when I have it), maple syrup and fish sauce (Thai Kitchen is a decent brand that's available in grocery stores- avoid the Philippine variety- too salty for this) and water. Add some cayenne or chili oil, garlic or garlic oil and some green or wild onions if available. Put in a jar and shake. Add more of whatever ingredient is lacking until it tastes good.

Nuoc mam is a vietnamese dipping sauce that's sweet, sour and a little fishy (duh). It's thin, so use some rice or rice noodles to help give enough surface area to deliver the flavor. It pairs well with fresh greens and herbs as well as grilled or fried meat. The greens and herbs can be either mild or bitter, so it pairs well with wild greens. My favorite use for it is with wild greens (cattail shoots, miner's lettuce, young dandelion greens, wild mint, watercress, young lamb's quarter, wild parsley, mountain bluebells, steamed stinging nettle tops, probably some others that I won't remember until I see them) and rice or rice noodles with some thinly sliced grilled meat on top and garnished with toasted nuts and pickled root vegetables. Just pour on the nuoc mam and enjoy. My wife drinks the leftover.

I make an annual pilgrimage to the top of Grand Mesa to gather Arnica Montana (medicinal purposes- joint pain), and celebrate the event with wild spring rolls. I slaughter, debone and grind a few rabbits ahead of time, then mix the ground meat with shredded cabbage, sesame oil, fresh ginger, garlic, onion powder, salt and pepper. I stock up on rice paper, then head out and gather the above-mentioned herbs and greens while I am stalking the wild Arnica. When I get back from my pilgrimage, I shape the rabbit sausage into breakfast sausage sized rolls and cook it up, then wrap it in rice paper that's been soaked for a few seconds in warn water and fry it again. To serve, I have butter lettuce leaves from the garden, cooked and chilled rice noodles (or ramen), and all of the wild herbs and greens. Take a pinch of noodles and put it into the center of a lettuce leaf, add a roll, whatever greens and herbs you like, roll it up, dip it in the nuoc mam and eat. You will smell like fish when you're done, but you will be happier and healthier, too. Oh, and ground chicken, pork, venison, beef or turkey is fine, too.

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zelph
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Re: At-home cooking

Postby zelph » Tue Mar 10, 2015 11:09 am

churro wrote:Alright, Here's another one meant to go with the rapid-fried lamb slices. "Hot and Sour cabbage". I like to serve the meat on top of the cabbage in a big platter or bowl, then provide bowls of rice that it can be spooned over. Steamed broccoli goes nicely, too, as well as fresh basil or mint. If yo want to limit the prep time, use a bag of coleslaw mix instead of a head of cabbage. (side note: cole slaw mix will dehydrate nicely and makes a good addition to ramen or any other soup).

1 head of cabbage
2 bell peppers (any color)
2 tbsp soy sauce
2 tbsp vinegar (I use homemade apple cider vinegar, made from our apple trees)
2 tbsp sugar, agave nectar or honey
1 tsp salt
3 tbsp oil
several dried jalepenos or a packet of cayenne from the pizza place
ground black pepper to taste
1 tbsp sesame oil

Slice the peppers and cabbage thin. In a small bowl, mix the soy sauce, vunegar, sugar and salt. Preheat a wok or skillet (if doing this with the lamb, do the cabbage first, put onto serving platter, then do the meat in the same skillet). Add oil to the skillet, then add the jalepenos or cayenne. After a few seconds, add the cabbage and bell peppers. Stir fry for a minute or two. Add the sauce mixture and stir well. Place in serving platter, drizzle with sesame oil and serve hot or cold.


My wife made a partial of your recipe using the bag-o-slaw easy-go waytogo. Unfortunately it was at a time that I had to run an errand and was not able to enjoy the meal with her. The cold left overs went down well :D she used thin sliced roast beef that I cooked in the bread machine.

I purchased a new fry pan yesterday to do more cooking :o ceramic coated so I should be able to succeed at any and all recipes :lol:
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

churro
Posts: 208
Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2015 12:00 pm

Re: At-home cooking

Postby churro » Thu Mar 12, 2015 8:51 pm

Here's an easy one that never fails to impress.

Red Wine Chicken:

1 chicken breast for each person (this recipe handles 4-6)
1 cup red wine
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup olive oil
2 tbsp water
2 cloves garlic, smashed
1 tsp dry, ground ginger
pinch or two of oregano
1 tbsp brown sugar

Mix the ingredients in an oven-safe container, add the breasts and cover with foil or a lid. Bake at 375 for 45 minutes, then begin checking for doneness. It's done when still tender but not pink inside. Gets tough if overcooked. In our family we serve it with baked potatoes (just throw these in the oven about 20 minutes before the chicken). Plate a breast and cut it up to increase surface area. Then open up your potato and spoon some sauce over both the chicken and the potato. The leftover meat makes good sandwich filling (slice it cold).

realityguy
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Location: slightly north of Seattle,WA

Re: At-home cooking

Postby realityguy » Thu Mar 12, 2015 9:34 pm

I see you don't live here with us..or the recipe would start out "2 chicken breasts for each person".. :lol:
The views and opinions expressed by this person are his own and not the general consensus of others on this website.Realityguy

churro
Posts: 208
Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2015 12:00 pm

Re: At-home cooking

Postby churro » Fri Mar 13, 2015 10:27 am

Good point. :dinner: I wouldn't want you going hungry...amend the recipe as necessary. Come to think of it, I usually just double up anyway, so as to have leftovers.


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