Marketing Corporate Camping

Backpacking is more than just about gear. Here's a forum to talk about the "philosophy" of lightweight backpacking.
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JesterJosev
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Marketing Corporate Camping

Postby JesterJosev » Mon Jun 04, 2012 5:14 am

Major ideas that drive me to bush craft are resourcefulness and self reliance. I want to develop both the knowledge and skills to bring my ideas to fruition with less reliance on popular products. My father once said to me that companies are competing to take your money. They may have convincing arguments, and amazing tools, but it’s your decision as a consumer if you should buy into their ideas. I’m sure that most of us on the forum have been through the marketing gauntlet of companies such as Coleman, and Walmart (http://www.campingblogger.net/gear/top- ... ducts.html). Don’t get me wrong if you find a deep fryer useful at camp more power to you; I’m happy you found a product that caters to your outdoor nugget frying needs :| . Personally I’m more than happy with a quality alcohol stove (http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/) ;) .

My concern is when I see companies entrenching ideas of being outdoors that can only be satisfied by buying restrictively expensive gear (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... iorama.JPG) :? . For some folks this it would appear that this is the only way to experience the outdoors, and anything less would be regressing into chaos :shock: . I see corporate campers trying living up to the corporate synthesized idea of reverse self sufficiency. People are working hard; to spend hundreds of dollars on the latest most repressed eight man tent they can lay their hands on. As such wilderness hikers can be perceived as quasi hobos who gear up with little more than a back pack of essentials (they may have made themselves), the clothes on their backs (ditto), and Kerouac their way into oblivion :DBfire: . I’m pitching hard rock’s I know, but that being said so does big business :dollar: .

So my question for you is, what effects of big business have you seen on outdoor culture?

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irrationalsolutions
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Re: Marketing Corporate Camping

Postby irrationalsolutions » Mon Jun 04, 2012 8:47 am

Personally I've seen it more in backpackers around here. They seem to take an the mind set that you have to have the latest negitive weight gear out to even desire the right to be out on the trail with them. At least that's who I usually run into around the trails I haunt.

Its all a mindset people get tricked into. Personally I'm the same way with fire. I have learned every way to start a fire that I find out about and have bought almost every fire starter I can find. Man needs fire and I won't be the one without. But that's my thing.

I'm still waiting to see a backpacker with a ton of ballons floating his pack behind him so he can have the lightest pack on the trail. :lol:
“Do or do not... there is NO try.” Yoda

Luke "Whats in (out) there?" Yoda "Only what you take with you."

Luke "I can’t believe it." Yoda "That is why you Fail.”

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ConnieD
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Re: Marketing Corporate Camping

Postby ConnieD » Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:10 am

I think those particular lightweight hikers are trying to look the part of "the elite".

It has become important to set yourself apart from the homeless.

I started getting outdoors with hand-me-down boy scout clothing and gear (pants, Yucca pack) and old plaid shirts.

There was always army surplus, right?

I know I was thrilled to see other color choices than olive drab. I welcomed Gortex because Goretex changed outdoor clothing, with different colors and no moth balls odor. But one garment and three washings later, using recommended products, I didn't want to throw away my money on a fashion garment again. But I did.

I tried lined Gortex. It was lined with netting. It made a pretty-good rain jacket for backpacking.

It went downhill from there. Two layers, three layers, Gortex had the same problems, the same planned obsolescence.

Planned, or not (likely not) I could no longer justify the spending for outdoor wear made with Gortex.

Not for actual outdoor use.

Along the way I had a British ventile mountaineering jacket. If I could afford it, now, I would have a British ventile anorak in sage green with a sage grey lining like that British ventile mountaineering jacket I had.

That and a Filson shorty fisherman jacket and my Bellstaff Trailmaster jacket and pants are worthy outdoor clothing, except the British ventile is the only one not too heavy for backpacking or mountaineering. I did see a French woman wearing a lightweight Barbour-type treated cotton. I have no idea what brand. Barbour Europe-market?

I joked at the entrance gate to state park, "Do I need to have a Coleman stove"?

The last time I made that joke was the last time. It was no longer funny. The ranger and the campground host looked over my outfit at the campsite to make sure I did not appear to be homeless. I am not stupid: I had a Coleman-type propane stove. I had a Coleman pop-up tent trailer.

Even so, that wasn't good enough for a 1-week camping. I had reserved two weeks: I was asked to vacate my campsite for a "special event". Would I mind?

I am not stupid: most of the campers had 3/4 million dollar plus fifth-wheel trailers with DISH tv and lots of gadgets and toys. I felt like I was in backyard suburbia, kids tossing a football, dad at the propane gas BBQ theater, mom making hors d'œuvres.

For me, it wasn't camping. I said, "No problem, I'll leave".

Before I left, the TV crew had arrived for the special event. I was interviewed for TV. The TV interviewer insisted. I noticed she selected people who were actually camping, had tents or, at most, tent trailers. My comments were aired on a Portland, OR TV station.

Recently, backpackers are viewed as society drop-outs, or, homeless if not kitted out with the right commercial gear.

I have seen old photos showing only the rich went camping. Only the rich did.

When I started going camping, as a small child, I felt we were rich to be able to do so. Our canoe, and Old Town wood and canvas Trapper Model canoe, was a rich-man's canoe. Dad's camera, an Argus C-44 with three lenses, was a rich hobbiest's camera. We had split bamboo fly-fishing rods. Fly-fishing was for rich-men.

Our trip to Grand Teton National Park in the 1950's and up thru the 1970's it was still a rich-man's national park.

Maybe it still is?

Before that era, everyone wanted their photograph made outdoors. But it was likely because the powder burned would burn down the house.

Boy Scouts changed all that. Every boy could get outdoors.

Soon every boy or girl could go to summer camp. Still, it was upper middle class kids.

Then, a poor kid could get sponsored to go to summer camp. Then, an inner-city kid could get sponsored to go to camp.

So getting outdoors and going camping remained respectable and was democratic. I liked that time.

Now, if you are long-distance hiking, or, out for more than a few days you had better flash some cash because you are seen as you are bumming and living in the woods.

I was staying at 2,150 acre retreat property for the rich in Marin county and I got rough treatment and I was jailed as a homeless bum in San Francisco, CA by being falsely accused of a crime by drug-addicts that were doing the crime, and, their drug-house partners-in-crime. In San Francisco, CA drug-addicts are the cash cow. No one wanted to hear what happened from me. No one. Anything at all was acceptable to get homeless people off-the-street. I wasn't homeless. I wasn't on-the-street.

I was wearing my truly expensive commercial outdoor clothing with labels. But it was made for the outdoors. It was fresh. I was clean. No matter. I was not in city-apparel.

There is a perception, now, if you dress like you participate in the outdoor industry (as it is called by commercial interests) you are bumming. That is because homeless people have discovered they get better treatment, if they dress like they are hiking or going camping. Why? They know the scene. Now jobless, they had jobs. They are not bums. But for some reason, our society wants to think they are bums.

There are two things happening: one, the people with jobs resent people with that much time for recreation, and two, people with jobs can't accept people with jobs are one paycheck, or at most, only 6-months joblessness away from homelessness.

These changes in our society have made difficulties for people who love the outdoors.

I'll tell you, if you put on some old clothes and go fishing, then, it just about had better be at the fishing hole where you are known as a local resident, or, your outfit just about has to look like you are going to the local resort fishing spot.

In many ways, we are back to the repressive aspects of the 1950's.

I liked the 1950's but because of all the conformity of the 1950's we got the 1960's. Maybe we could regress back to the 1940's? The clothing was nicer. How about the 1940's?

realityguy
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Re: Marketing Corporate Camping

Postby realityguy » Mon Jun 04, 2012 5:37 pm

I think Seattle and the Northwest hikers are generally more prone to expensive gear and toys for hiking(skiing,whatever) because of the local corporate economy and thinking locally..,REI,Eddie Bauer, and all the other advertising thrown their way.Heaven forbid up here if you aren't wearing expensive backpacks,boots, clothes,or forgot your Jet Boil at home! :o :lol: Alcohol stoves and hammock hanging are a very small market compared to canister ones and tents in these parts."Homemade" gear is pretty nonexistent except to a few here who would rather make it than buy it.Pulling out an alcohol stove or hammock(just examples) gets an inquisitive "What's that?" rather than questions regarding of ..who's?..make your own?..or what's your fuel/hanger preference?
I imagine some of that philosophy has trickled up north there,JJ... ;) Most pricey manufactured items I've bought here were secondhand(at 10 cents on the dollar) and then some modified to better suit the tasks I wanted them for...from people who donated them after their items/color were "no longer in style" the year following when they purchased them.Fine with me! I'm not one who cares if my $5 SD rainjacket's color doesn't match my $2 REI rainpaints..or if it just happens to have "Microsoft" stitched on it..as long as it serves its purpose. The price was right! .. :lol: Keep in mind that every label you have on your gear makes you a free walking billboard for the company you bought it from.If it was worth the time to take all the advertising off, I would.
The views and opinions expressed by this person are his own and not the general consensus of others on this website.Realityguy

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irrationalsolutions
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Re: Marketing Corporate Camping

Postby irrationalsolutions » Mon Jun 04, 2012 6:06 pm

Until the last couple years I used to think of backpackers as the most inventive people. Now the ones I run into the most or more sheeple. But what ever. I don't fit in on my favorite trails anymore because I refuse to go ultralite. I tried it and it doesn't fit me. I cut weight here and there as it suits me but for the most part I like what I like and I use it.

I will say this though I would gladly sew a zelph stoveworks patch on my pack if I had one. And I would put my starlyte or cobalt up against any of the latest to stoves on the market. I use them more than I do the ones I made. Im still trying to convince myself that I need a go to stove right now I just know I want one but I'm almost at need to get one. :DB:
“Do or do not... there is NO try.” Yoda

Luke "Whats in (out) there?" Yoda "Only what you take with you."

Luke "I can’t believe it." Yoda "That is why you Fail.”

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zelph
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Re: Marketing Corporate Camping

Postby zelph » Mon Jun 04, 2012 11:00 pm

Don’t get me wrong if you find a deep fryer useful at camp more power to you; I’m happy you found a product that caters to your outdoor nugget frying needs


:lol: I like that!!!! Some even talk pressure cookers for the trail :) Did you ever see the photos of a "Fancee Feest" stove under a full size pressure canner that I used to cook chicken breasts? I over cooked them, they shredded themselves apart in the cooker :o I think they exploded :? It was an easy way to get "pulled chicken" :lol:

Many time I'm led to think of the animated movie "Ants" The ants line themselves up with the ant in front of them and follow blindly. It seems that's what happens on forums. Someone will say how great an expensive brand name item is and low and behold everyone lines up to buy one. It happens with Cottage Industry items also. Bushbuddy stove and the Back Country Boiler are examples that come to mind. But.....there are ants that break away from the norm and become independant. ;) They can think on their own.

Sporting goods industry equals billions of dollars yearly.

I will say this though I would gladly sew a zelph stoveworks patch on my pack if I had one. And I would put my starlyte or cobalt up against any of the latest to stoves on the market. I use them more than I do the ones I made. Im still trying to convince myself that I need a go to stove right now I just know I want one but I'm almost at need to get one.


Oh My!!! thanks "irrationalsolutions" that's quite a compliment :oops:
"Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained" stove store = http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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irrationalsolutions
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Re: Marketing Corporate Camping

Postby irrationalsolutions » Mon Jun 04, 2012 11:20 pm

No problem. You make a good product and I don't mind spreading the word
“Do or do not... there is NO try.” Yoda

Luke "Whats in (out) there?" Yoda "Only what you take with you."

Luke "I can’t believe it." Yoda "That is why you Fail.”

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ConnieD
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Re: Marketing Corporate Camping

Postby ConnieD » Tue Jun 05, 2012 1:23 am

zelph stoveworks patch

I know I want one.

The outdoors industry has become a big industry!

I think I should point out, all but one tent or tent trailer camper was asked to leave.

It was my impression their outfit was considered photogenic. Their tent site would be the token tent campers.

The television crew arrived earlier than anticipated. <snicker>

realityguy
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Re: Marketing Corporate Camping

Postby realityguy » Tue Jun 05, 2012 10:43 am

Image

The new corporate symbol has to have el presidente on it ..doesn't it? ;)
The views and opinions expressed by this person are his own and not the general consensus of others on this website.Realityguy

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zelph
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Re: Marketing Corporate Camping

Postby zelph » Tue Jun 05, 2012 4:03 pm

That similar to this

New line of Decals for give aways on every order purchased by the coolade cultists.

Image

:lol: :lol: :lol:
"Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained" stove store = http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/


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