Make a Down Quilt

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ConnieD
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Make a Down Quilt

Postby ConnieD » Tue Apr 10, 2012 1:59 pm

I cannot provide a direct link because it will immediately start to download.

Here is where I found the 35 degree down quilt PDF.
http://www.teamgunnparker.com/downloads.php?cat_id=1

If you want to make it a warmer quilt, increase the baffle depth and increase the quality and/or quantity of down.

How much? Look at the specifications of baffle depth and down-fill for existing products.

If you want differential-cut or offset or karo baffles, there is online help.

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zelph
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Re: Make a Down Quilt

Postby zelph » Tue Apr 10, 2012 10:07 pm

That's cool/warm info. Very nice site. Look at their home page:

http://www.teamgunnparker.com/news.php

Think they are Australian :?:
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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ConnieD
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Re: Make a Down Quilt

Postby ConnieD » Tue Apr 10, 2012 10:23 pm

I was on the website much of the entire day.

He is doing trail work. His trip report is so different than here.

He also has mileages and approximate time to hike that mileage, which accounts for terrain.

His gear list is almost like mine, yet, the terrain and the conditions are so different as shown in photos.

The other PDF's are worthwhile. I found it a very enjoyable and excellent website.

I found more information about sewing nylon.
http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin ... d_id=51655

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ConnieD
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Re: Make a Down Quilt

Postby ConnieD » Wed Apr 11, 2012 11:47 am

If you are unfamiliar with sleeping quilts sleep systems for backpacking, think open zipper on a mummy sleeping bag.

The foot is usually closed with OMNI tape (no snag or less snag velcro-type) and a drawstring or sewn. Many top quilts sold to the "hammock hangers" are sleeping quilts I am describing.

There are, basically, two designs:

1. The quilt may only come up to your chin. There is a drawstring to snug it up under your chin. Either you wear a balaclava, a down hat, or a hood for a jacket.

2. If the quilt comes up over your head, you toss it over your head. If down, you wear a PolarWrap half mask or balaclava to reduce moisture. Some top quilts have a patch of soft fleece to reduce moisture on the down.

Apex is a synthetic insulation used in sleeping quilts for backpacking. It only has to be sewn at the edges to secure it in place in the quilt. For this reason, it is easier to make a sleeping quilt for backpacking, if you use one or two layers of Apex insulation.

The advantage is the reduction of weight, if compared to a sleeping bag.

If your sleeping quilt for backpacking has sewn loops on the sides, it may be secured by elastic cord under the air mattress or mattress pad. Other designs favor a wider sleeping quilt, so wide that the edges do not make air-gaps for cold to enter.

I find I am able to use a backpacking sleeping quilt in combination with a Half Bag, for example, the Brooks-Range Alpini Elephant Foot half bag and PolarWrap half mask or PolarWrap balaclava and hood for a jacket for complete coverage.

The reason I like this component backpacking sleeping system idea is versatility: I can use the same gear as multipurpose and in different seasons of the year by only small changes in sleep clothing or accessories, like the PolarWrap half mask and hat or hood from a jacket.

Another advantage is expense: the finest materials in a backpacking sleeping quilt are the same price, or less, as a quality sleeping bag.

If DIY/MYOG, I recommend 800+ 850 or 900-fill down in SevenD, Momentum 50 or no more than 8D lightweight DWR finish nylon ripstop fabric. The down and the fabric are so lightweight, air-gaps are eliminated as the down and the fabric settle in around you. I find I can turn on to my side and the down momentarily fluffs back out on its own.

If you use these materials, they is so lightweight and so low volume in your backpack, you may think you forgot to bring your overnight gear.

Here is my DIY/MYOG .info webpage list for materials.
http://www.ultralightbackpackingonline. ... ymyog.html

Here are brand name backpacking sleeping quilts for your consideration: Tewa, Wilderness Logics, Enlightened Equipment, Nunatak, Hammock Gear, Arrowhead Equipment, Jacks R Better. The top quilts are the backpacking sleeping quilts. The under quilts may be used, if there is an elastic cord at the ends. The OMNI tape may be added.

Here is a Completed Backpacking Quilt.
http://paulaslongwalk.wordpress.com/201 ... ing-quilt/

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zelph
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Re: Make a Down Quilt

Postby zelph » Thu Apr 12, 2012 3:56 pm

Lots of info there Connie, thank you.

I did a quick read of it while I'm here at Mcdonalds using their WIFI.

The WIFI at the campground is terribley slow :( I'll read it again tonight when I get back to camp.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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ConnieD
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Re: Make a Down Quilt

Postby ConnieD » Thu Apr 12, 2012 4:12 pm

I never, previously, understood why mountainclimbers, especially, wanted 800+ fill down and ultralightweight fabric.

I couldn't afford it, for one thing. Nevertheless, my Sierra Designs 300 "Perfect" was a great sleeping bag. I weighed almost 2.5 lbs. I think it had 650-fill down and 1.1 oz/sqyd nylon ripstop.

Now that we can purchase 800-fill and 900-fill down by the ounce for DIY/MYOG I found out, why.

This is great stuff.

True, you can have a great 550-fill or 650-fill sleeping bag, with differential-cut offset baffles, a neck roll, excellent footbox and hood. Nevertheless, I thought people would like to know how great this stuff is and, if they don't want to pay top dollar, the materials are available. They were never available retail before. I looked for them. I never saw them, until now.

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ConnieD
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Re: Make a Down Quilt

Postby ConnieD » Mon Apr 30, 2012 3:37 pm

Thru-Hiker is a great resource for DIY. Thru-Hiker has an article about this.

http://www.thru-hiker.com/projects/down_quilt.php

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zelph
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Re: Make a Down Quilt

Postby zelph » Mon Apr 30, 2012 10:27 pm

ConnieD wrote:Thru-Hiker is a great resource for DIY. Thru-Hiker has an article about this.

http://www.thru-hiker.com/projects/down_quilt.php


A quote from that site:

Insulation works in one of two ways: either by dead air space (loft) or by reflection (radiation). A mixture of these two types of insulations should be

avoided especially when working with down in order to maintain maximum loft and vapor transfer. The first type of insulation, dead air space, is what is used

in sleeping bags and in most insulation found today here on Earth. They work on the principle of tiny particles trapping heat produced by a [body] and keeping

them warm by discouraging convection. If convection takes place, warmth will be lost. Therefore, the particles/fibers that fill the space must be so fine so as

to hinder convection altogether. Using this, we can now say that the thicker the particles trapping air (loft) the greater the warmth that it provides (i.e. it has

to be fluffy to work). If one lies on the bottom part of his sleeping bag, all of the insulation under the body is crushed and is therefore no longer useful

insulation (It should be said at this point that heat rises). So why have crushed insulation on the bottom? You already sleep on some sort of pad (it's main

purpose is insulation, not comfort); use it instead of dragging along the extra "dead" insulation on the under part of your sleeping bag. This is why a quilt will

keep you warm, yet weighs half as much as its equivalent bag, and compresses twice as much.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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ConnieD
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Re: Make a Down Quilt

Postby ConnieD » Fri May 11, 2012 9:49 am

I started this thread, because I have had a lot of experience with the issues involved.

I have had 2.5 lb sleeping bags for low temperatures. I have used them sleeping quilt style, unzipped, with my feet inside or outside the footbox.

I purchased a Marmot Egret (I think) which was one of the first sleeping quilts. If I got the name right, it was sewn-thru construction for the down upper portion and polyester for the zip in or zip off botrtem sheet that had a pocket and/or straps for holding the Therma-Rest sleeping pad in place. It wasn't particularly warm enough for backpacking purposes and it only marginally had a lower pack volume than a sleeping bag.

I was interested in warm enough for backpacking purposes and lower pack volume than a sleeping bag.

Over the intervening years I purchased three different half-bags, each one rated for a different temperature.

Half bags are a good option.

I got interested in sleeping quilts again, with Enlightened Equipment. I closely watched hammock TQ top quilts and UQ under quilts with considerable interest: does it have the length and width I need for a sleeping quilt? will the elastic cords snug up to make a footbox? should I get the top quilt with the sewn footbox or the velcro footbox? Each option is a warm sleeping quilt for backpacking purposes.

I looked at pack weight and pack volume.

There are excellent pre-made options, now, for sleeping quilts for backpacking purposes.

But which one has all the "best" features?

I'd say, 800-fill or 900-fill down in a sleeping quilt made of Momentum to SevenD weight fabric for warmth, light pack weight and low pack volume. If you are up to it, I'd say a catenary-cut sleeping quilt, where the inside cover fabric has less size than the outer cover fabric, is most efficient. I would have offset slant-tubes of down using the most lightweight no-see-um mesh.

My sleeping quilt for backpacking would be long enough to throw over my head. My "minimalist" sleeping quilt for backpacking would come up to under my arms, much like a half bag, to be used with a puffy hooded belay parka.

Pre-made sleeping quilts for backpacking purposes are available for considerable out-of-pocket expense, while a custom sleeping quilt for backpacking purposes can be made for less than the cost of a reasonably well-made quality sleeping bag.

Most people advise sewing really cheap fabric, that handles about the same, to get your sewing skills and the dimensions worked out before you work with any of the more costly materials. I had enough quilts and half bags around to know the overall size I wanted to achieve. Then, I had to account for the down-fill changing the overall length and width. It is probably simpler after all to make the first sleeping quilt from inexpensive materials.

Practically everyone advises purchasing sufficient down for 10% overfill to account for "lost" down. Sold in one ounce bags, it seems to me one ounce bag per one 6-inch down tube is a good rule-of-thumb, opening the one ounce bag of down inside the down tube, not outside. There are examples of using a clean vacuum cleaner in reverse to push the down inside the down tubes. I haven't worked out how to do that at home. Maybe a Shop Vac?

At any rate, I am delighted with my 900-fill half bag in Pertex fabric. Now, I am on to the adventure of making my own full size sleeping quilt for backpacking.

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zelph
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Re: Make a Down Quilt

Postby zelph » Fri May 11, 2012 9:56 pm

My sleeping quilt for backpacking would be long enough to throw over my head.


Make it 4" longer to insure your head is covered well to keep out the early morning sunlight. :D Sometimes we like to sleep a little longer and it's hard to do with all the unwanted light ;)
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/


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