cheese

Share your favorite food, the greasier the better. I love bacon!!!!! and also eggs.
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Ridgerunner
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Re: cheese

Postby Ridgerunner » Thu Nov 27, 2008 12:42 am

Freeze drying and dehydrating are two different processes. I think Zelph was asking if shredded cheese can be dehydrated at home and then rehydrated in the field. To which i do not know. Has anyone tried to dehydrate shredded cheese?
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hoz
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Re: cheese

Postby hoz » Thu Nov 27, 2008 6:58 am

While I haven't tried it, some canoe trippers over at Canadian Canoe Routes did and (according to them) it worked (somewhat). They said it's even nice to use the dehydrated shreds as a snack.

Next time I'm in the store I'll buy a bag of shreds for an experiment and have a go.

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zelph
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Re: cheese

Postby zelph » Thu Nov 27, 2008 12:28 pm

hoz wrote:While I haven't tried it, some canoe trippers over at Canadian Canoe Routes did and (according to them) it worked (somewhat). They said it's even nice to use the dehydrated shreds as a snack.

Next time I'm in the store I'll buy a bag of shreds for an experiment and have a go.


I have a block of sharp cheddar in the fridge, I'll coarse grate it and dry it and try it :D In times past I would cut off the hardened end of it and cut a fresh chunk off and enjoy. The part I cut off was rock hard and no mold. We'll see. Let's venture :)
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brooklynkayak
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Re: cheese

Postby brooklynkayak » Tue Dec 02, 2008 10:05 pm

I think when it comes to dehydrating, fat goes rancid faster than lean. Cheese has a good amount of fat. The way to get around this is to use a lot of salt like in the standard dryish cheeses like Parmesan, Romano, ... and just cut the mold off when it's time to use. Some mold is OK and in some cases can improve the flavor, but don't count on it.
Shredded/grated reduces the shelf life as mold and bacteria can grow much faster and spread thru the whole thing.

The freeze dried powder cheeses are designed to be kept in the original container or at least kept 100% dry. If the powder gets any moisture the mold will spread throughout like fresh.

I stick with the standard dry type block cheeses and trim off the mold and shred/grate as needed. Really works great with a lot of dishes. Wrap in vinegar soaked cloth and/or wax to extend the shelf life even more.

stevie
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zelph
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Re: cheese

Postby zelph » Wed Dec 03, 2008 12:40 am

brooklynkayak wrote:I think when it comes to dehydrating, fat goes rancid faster than lean. Cheese has a good amount of fat. The way to get around this is to use a lot of salt like in the standard dryish cheeses like Parmesan, Romano, ... and just cut the mold off when it's time to use. Some mold is OK and in some cases can improve the flavor, but don't count on it.
Shredded/grated reduces the shelf life as mold and bacteria can grow much faster and spread thru the whole thing.

The freeze dried powder cheeses are designed to be kept in the original container or at least kept 100% dry. If the powder gets any moisture the mold will spread throughout like fresh.

I stick with the standard dry type block cheeses and trim off the mold and shred/grate as needed. Really works great with a lot of dishes. Wrap in vinegar soaked cloth and/or wax to extend the shelf life even more.

stevie


I'm sure I've eaten my share of mold. On occasion I've made a sandwhich and scoffed down three or four bites only to see that the crust is green :mrgreen: :roll:

The stuff i shredded is in the fridge drying and so far it's rock hard with no green fuzzies, looking good.

Thanks for your tips broklynkayak, good ones :D
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russb
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Re: cheese

Postby russb » Wed Dec 03, 2008 7:21 pm

zelph wrote:
I'm sure I've eaten my share of mold. On occasion I've made a sandwhich and scoffed down three or four bites only to see that the crust is green :mrgreen: :roll:

The stuff i shredded is in the fridge drying and so far it's rock hard with no green fuzzies, looking good.

Thanks for your tips broklynkayak, good ones :D


Natural penicillin there eh?

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zelph
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Re: cheese

Postby zelph » Thu Dec 04, 2008 1:58 am

russb wrote:
zelph wrote:
I'm sure I've eaten my share of mold. On occasion I've made a sandwhich and scoffed down three or four bites only to see that the crust is green :mrgreen: :roll:

The stuff i shredded is in the fridge drying and so far it's rock hard with no green fuzzies, looking good.

Thanks for your tips broklynkayak, good ones :D


Natural penicillin there eh?


No extra cost either :) I used to make a soybean product that was heated by light bulbs in a styrofoam cooler. Mycylium grew between the cooked soybeans and formed a web like structure that held the beans enmass. It looked like a soybean meatloaf :roll: It was then cut up into pieces and fried. very yummy. Help me think of the name of it. :mrgreen:
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WhiteTail
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Re: cheese

Postby WhiteTail » Thu Dec 04, 2008 9:17 am

zelph wrote:I used to make a soybean product that was heated by light bulbs in a styrofoam cooler. Mycylium grew between the cooked soybeans and formed a web like structure that held the beans enmass. It looked like a soybean meatloaf :roll: It was then cut up into pieces and fried. very yummy. Help me think of the name of it. :mrgreen:



Are you talking about tempeh?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tempeh

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zelph
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Re: cheese

Postby zelph » Thu Dec 04, 2008 3:46 pm

WhiteTail wrote:
zelph wrote:I used to make a soybean product that was heated by light bulbs in a styrofoam cooler. Mycylium grew between the cooked soybeans and formed a web like structure that held the beans enmass. It looked like a soybean meatloaf :roll: It was then cut up into pieces and fried. very yummy. Help me think of the name of it. :mrgreen:



Are you talking about tempeh?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tempeh


Thank You WhiteTail, that's the word I was needing.

Tempeh, takes a long time to make but the proof is in the eating.

Tempeh with eggs :D Protien to the max. Great aroma when cooking it, earthy when creating it ;)

Thanks WhiteTail
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