zelph wood stove

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JBRanger
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Re: zelph wood stove

Postby JBRanger » Mon Oct 03, 2011 10:51 am

Interesting on the paint idea. On mine, the SS SEEMS to be doing its job down low. I have a EVER so small spot up near the rim. Seriously its less than dime sized.

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zelph
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Re: zelph wood stove

Postby zelph » Mon Oct 03, 2011 3:00 pm

JBRanger wrote:Interesting on the paint idea. On mine, the SS SEEMS to be doing its job down low. I have a EVER so small spot up near the rim. Seriously its less than dime sized.


The ss will prevent the wall from burning out. I'll see if i can a photo of my 1st proto that shows how the stove looks with out the protection of the ss liner. In that area you can accumilate a lot of red hot charcol and never make the outside wall get red hot. Without the liner it gets red hot quickly.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

sudden
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Re: zelph wood stove

Postby sudden » Fri Oct 07, 2011 4:25 pm

I just started testing mine today. Since there were some questions about adding a coating of high temp paint, I went ahead and painted mine (2 light coats then burned it ~15min later).

The paint held up surprisingly well. I think that has something to do with the inner liner. I use the same paint on my charcoal/wood grill and it always overheats where the coals rest and burns the paint away. There were no signs of this on the zelph stove. This was after ~4 full burns.

I didn't have twigs, and I know several burns were already tested with fixed lengths of wood so I went a slightly different route. I didn't do a boil test yet (that's been covered already and I know it will boil just fine). What I did have on hand was dry split maple logs (not sure which type). I split those down to an approximate twig diameter (my technical term for something I can break with my hands :ugeek: ).

I wanted a situation as close as possible to real world. In my case, I plan on using the stove for more than hiking/camping. I will take it with me hunting. I took my split wood and broke what I could into shorter pieces for the stove. I ended up with variable lengths of twigs and varying diameters. That's what I was aiming for. I packed the wood into the stove as tight as I could (more on this later) and used the small shavings from splitting as the top layer (twigs were stacked vertical, kindling was random). I did not need a weber cube. The stove started with one match.

I kept adding wood after the initial burn, for two reasons. I wanted to see how the paint held up and how easy the stove was to keep lit. It did great. I can see myself boiling water for coffee or hot chocolate and also keeping the fire going just for warmth. I put nearly 4 full loads of wood through it. One thing I always have to worry about when hunting is containing the fire. The stove worked great for this. During the whole burn time, I didn't lose any coals or burning wood outside the stove. I had some really long sticks in there after the initial burn just to push the limits. The other cool discovery is how well the lower grate contains the coals. After all that burning there was almost no ash on the lower heat shield. All the hot coals stayed contained in the lower part of the stove at or below the inner heat shield.

The stove is really lightweight, very strong, and like everyone else said, it burns the wood down to almost nothing. It lit up for me without any extra help.

One thing I can recommend is that you load your larger sticks first. I did it randomly and ended up doing more work than I needed. Put the fat stuff in first then fill the gaps with your skinny twigs. If you load it randomly it still burns well but you can end up with one side burning out before the other (hard to describe this but I had too many skinny twigs in one half and it burned down faster that the side with fatter sticks, the fire was off center, not a big deal).

So far I can't find any negatives. I'll be messing around with it some more. I want to try cooking on it next :)

I took some pics, not sure if it's worth posting them, nothing new to see except the stove paint.

My grandson is already asking for a cookout with it :DP:
"People are not persuaded by what we say, but rather by what they understand."

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zelph
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Re: zelph wood stove

Postby zelph » Fri Oct 14, 2011 4:41 pm

Theanks for the feed back sudden. I'm not back from camping until tomorrow and I'll try to respond with something ASAP.........................Dan
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

JBRanger
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Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 3:02 pm

Re: zelph wood stove

Postby JBRanger » Sat Oct 15, 2011 5:42 pm

More and more I've used this stove. It's still fantastic.

However, one possible addition?
The wire mesh pot support, is there any way to make this solid? I just used the stove in some REALLY high wind conditions. Gusting to 30 knots. This would help with wood fires as well as what I call alcohol mode.
Flip the stove over and use the bottom of the grate (firebox?) as support for the small alcohol stove that you sent me Zelph. It's the one similar to a Starlyte but made from aluminum bottle. Anyway, use the solid support as both pot support but also windscreen. This would still fit inside of the stove.

Thoughts? I'll try to get some pics to better explain.

sudden
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Re: zelph wood stove

Postby sudden » Sat Oct 15, 2011 6:28 pm

JBRanger wrote:More and more I've used this stove. It's still fantastic.

However, one possible addition?
The wire mesh pot support, is there any way to make this solid? I just used the stove in some REALLY high wind conditions. Gusting to 30 knots. This would help with wood fires as well as what I call alcohol mode.
Flip the stove over and use the bottom of the grate (firebox?) as support for the small alcohol stove that you sent me Zelph. It's the one similar to a Starlyte but made from aluminum bottle. Anyway, use the solid support as both pot support but also windscreen. This would still fit inside of the stove.

Thoughts? I'll try to get some pics to better explain.


The superstove should work inside if you flip the wood stove upside down over it. I had the same thought but didn't try it because I modded my super stove to a different shape.

Not so sure of making the hardware cloth portion solid. Do you mean permanently attached or solid metal sheet?

We are getting the same gusty winds here today. I think a separate windscreen would be a must in these conditions. I always liked the idea of a cloth windscreen that you stake out near the stove.
"People are not persuaded by what we say, but rather by what they understand."

JBRanger
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Re: zelph wood stove

Postby JBRanger » Sun Oct 16, 2011 4:23 pm

Hrmm... I'll have to try the SS inside of it.

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zelph
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Re: zelph wood stove

Postby zelph » Mon Oct 17, 2011 11:35 pm

The Super Stove is designed to have a pot directly sitting on it. Use the cut out bottom/top of a soup can as a flame diffusor. A disc the same diameter as the stove or a tad larger. You don't want to have direct flame on the pot support of the SS for a long time. It will start to anneal the alum.

The mesh pot support needs to be open so flames can exit. Making it solid will make the stove "dead" :o Make an external windscreen for it. Place your pack upwind of it. Use your body to sheild the stove. A boulder, whatever is available. Dig a hole and put it down into it :mrgreen:

Painting the stove with black stove paint is a great idea.

I recently purchased some stainless steel cans on ebay that will be used to make a small version of this stove. Here is how the listing describes the cans:

This auction is for a quantity of 100 each, Stainless Steel No. 2 cans with easy open lids. Commonly referred to as a 307 X 409 size, they measure 3-7/16" in Dia by 4-9/16" Tall. These cans must be sealed using a properly equipped can sealer.

My prices are more than 75% less than other cans avaiable on line and they are manufactured from superior Stainless Steel rather than tin plated mild steel.

I will only be selling these until I run out, I am not in the can business, I'm only selling the remnants of a failed project.
The oxygen infusor really works great for wood fires. On calm nights it's mesmorizing to watch the center column of flame do it's thing. :D
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

JBRanger
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Re: zelph wood stove

Postby JBRanger » Mon Nov 21, 2011 11:44 am

Got to test out the stove "in the field". Went on a camp over at Cloudland Canyon.

Good thing:
Stove worked just the same as normal.... PERFECT.

Bad thing:
Can't really see needing this in normal backpacking with others. It's just that we make a fire to stay warm with and huddle around. Thus no real need for the stove as I can cook directly on the fire.

When on the move, I either eat "no cook" meals or break out the alky stove.
So while it works perfect, it will remain in a "Get home bag" in the car.

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zelph
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Re: zelph wood stove

Postby zelph » Mon Nov 21, 2011 7:46 pm

Thanks for the feedback :D It's a good backpacking stove for big guys like me :D I'll have to see if I can find a photo of the BushBuddy stove next to a quart can. As you know the bushbuddy was praised as a backpacking stove. :o

The stove was designed for an emergency preparedness kit. The 72 hour kind. It was desinged to burn wood pellets, easy to carry in the kit. 1 cup of pellets will boil 2 cups of water. After the pellets are used up, twigs can be used efficiently. Yes, good stove to have in the trunk of your car along with some pellets.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/


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