GI Joe Stove

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zelph
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GI Joe Stove

Postby zelph » Sat Mar 26, 2011 12:29 am

In the last couple weeks I've had two people ask me what stove works well with a GI Joe type cup and stove. I've come close to one that works well and is stable in the confined area under the cup.

One guy said there is a program "Stove For Soldiers" does anyone know if that program is really in effect? Are they really shipping little alcohol stoves to soldiers in areas of conflict?
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http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

JollyRogers
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Re: GI Joe Stove

Postby JollyRogers » Sun Mar 27, 2011 12:18 am

A lot of the stove makers got together about 2 years ago and started mailing a few stoves to troops as well as instructions on how to make them. I just sent a cook set complete with stove last month to a buddy deployed in Afghanistan. (He's a medic so getting 91% alcohol will be pretty easy).

He's not in a real cold part of the desert or anything but, then again it gets awful cold at night. Speaking from experience, I can say "hot-wets" were one of the biggest morale boosters we got in the field, (although mail call was the #1 morale booster, by far). And in my years in the service I can only remember about 3 times getting "hot-wets" shipped in from base.
"Hot-wets" are defined as anything hot and wet, such as coca, tea, coffee, chicken broth, soup, etc.
After a few days of eating ambient temperature MRE's anything hot and wet is heavenly. It's the little things that count when it comes to morale.

I have been keeping buddies stocked in stoves and good cigars for nearly a year now.

If anyone wants to donate some stoves, (or anything else), to the troops, contact your local American Legion, VFW, etc... they routinely send care packages and can direct you on how to ship things over.

Personally, I belong to the American Legion and also know a lot of wives of my buddies and try to always have something ready for the next shipment.

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zelph
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Re: GI Joe Stove

Postby zelph » Sun Mar 27, 2011 12:33 pm

Were you in a squad group out in the field, in a company size group, a platoon?

How did you carry water and what means did you have to heat it? Hexamine tabs?

On forums a discussion will arise about fire starters and there is always someone that comes up with C-4 explosives used as fuel . I get so sick of hearing that. :roll:

What kind of fuel is available to soldiers? What is used to heat mri's?

Some info sent to me stated that soldiers out in the field discard some of their rations so they can carry more ammo. Malnutrition is common, weight loss of up to 30 pounds is common for those out near the action/front lines. How does mail get to those guys and how often?

Do you have to know someone that has family on the front line in order to get them a stove? I suspect you have to have a soldiers name in order to send him one.

Is there an organized group of military wives that can get stoves directly to soldiers that will use them?
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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ConnieD
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Re: GI Joe Stove

Postby ConnieD » Sun Mar 27, 2011 2:16 pm

It is my experience any APO address is postage free.

FYI
ref: http://zenstoves.net/Stoves.htm
Lab grade ethanol may have benzene or other chemicals mixed in with it.

BTW
zenstoves also says, about Heet methanol: You may also be able to purchase this for around US$3 per gallon at race shops that sell it as race fuel.


I spotted this stove in development and now available: http://www.canteenshop.com/id31.html

It uses every fuel. I had got out my stainless steel G.I. cups to consider it.

My lightweight backpacking gear is plenty sturdy, but I can see a lot of the guys would like it.

zelph, In the last couple weeks I've had two people ask me what stove works well with a GI Joe type cup and stove. I've come close to one that works well and is stable in the confined area under the cup.

zelph, I think, a lot more than "two people" would like that. :idea:

JollyRogers
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Re: GI Joe Stove

Postby JollyRogers » Sun Mar 27, 2011 6:33 pm

zelph wrote:Were you in a squad group out in the field, in a company size group, a platoon?
That really depended on where we were and what we were doing. With the Marines any unit that goes to the field has a medic. During training, typically 1 medic per platoon. War time, usually every squad had a medic. (I was a medic, so I was out in the field more than about anyone.)

How did you carry water and what means did you have to heat it? Hexamine tabs?
We carried canteens, water cans and water buffalos. Troops now have canteens but also a form of water bladder. Unless we were in a "cold weather environment" we didn't get anything to heat water or MRE's. The first time I had a hot MRE was when we were issued winter MRE's 200 miles form the Soviet border, (almost everything required hot water in these). They were Trioxane tablets that made awful fumes and didn't burn hot at all. You just did your best and tried heating water in a canteen cup.
We also got the chemical MRE heaters. A sleeve that you added water to and then the chemical reaction generated heat. You could slide your main course MRE packet into the heater and roll it shut like a lunch sack to warm, not really heat, your MRE. They didn't last long and were dangerous. Since they took so long to heat up, guys would slip them into their cargo pockets for warmth while heating and the chemical would leak out and leave chemical burns. Because of this no one wanted to use them. Acutally, it was rare either were used in the field as they both took too much time to heat things. They were better used at observation points and fox holes. Units on the move rarely get hot food.


On forums a discussion will arise about fire starters and there is always someone that comes up with C-4 explosives used as fuel . I get so sick of hearing that. :roll:
C4 was widely used in Viet Nam. It actually works ok until someone tries to stomp it out and blows their boot heel off. I did some time with combat engineers and we tested this theory. Truth be told, C4 was about the best "controlled" heat source I ever saw in the military.

What kind of fuel is available to soldiers? What is used to heat mri's?
Trioxane... maybe. If you weren't in a certified "cold weather climate" you didn't get them. Usually MRE's are eaten cold. Sometimes we would put them on an engine block or let them cook in the sun on a hot rock before opening. Eventually, it all tasted the same, hot or cold, so you didn't bother. Hot wets being the exception

Some info sent to me stated that soldiers out in the field discard some of their rations so they can carry more ammo. Malnutrition is common, weight loss of up to 30 pounds is common for those out near the action/front lines. How does mail get to those guys and how often?
Not so much to carry more ammo, just to carry less weight. Their is a lot of waste in MRE's. Lots of guys would just take what they liked out of the MRE's and left the rest. Who needs 3 packs of matches a day? Toilet paper? We tore off the sleeves of our t-shirts when in need. We didn't get malnutrition because of ammo/weight though. It was because MRE's suck all of the water out of you. After awhile you felt like your heart was pumping sand unless you drank 20 canteens a day, (and then spent all of your free time peeing). That and the fact that you just get sick of MRE's. I used to carry a jar of yellow mustard and cans of tuna to mix things up or to keep nourished. I also saved all of my little Tobasco bottles. MRE's tend to constipate you since they soak up so much water. Best way to take care of business was to pour about 4-5 of those Tobasco bottles into 1 MRE. A few hours later you were a few pounds lighter. I once went almost 10 days without relief. It wasn't fun or pretty.

Mail call is about the only "right" you have in the military. On base it is every day. If you are deployed it could be anywhere from daily to once a month depending on the supply line. Care packages are kind of a waste. Not totally a waste, because the troops do get them. It's mainly because anything not addressed to a specific unit or person ends up in someone's pocket that never sees the front line. I was attached to the grunts the whole time with the Marines. It really angered me seeing officers and bean counters getting all the care packages when they were living in air conditioned tents. Because of this I recommend you find a spouse and send a care package to a specific person or unit.


Do you have to know someone that has family on the front line in order to get them a stove? I suspect you have to have a soldiers name in order to send him one.
If you really want to make sure it gets to someone who needs it, then yes. You at least need the address of someone in the unit you want to receive the stove for reasons posted above. Otherwise some guy will be making coffee at his desk with your alcohol stove.

Is there an organized group of military wives that can get stoves directly to soldiers that will use them?
Usually, check with your local national guard post. They have lots of meetings and spouse support. This would be a good place to get information on individuals and units, including their addresses.


Connie, you rarely get free postage to an APO address unless you do so through a military organization. The military has their own postal service, so as long as it is sent through them you might get it free. But if you send it via the USPS you will still have to pay. However, you do get discounted postage, I believe it is always a flat rate.

JollyRogers
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Re: GI Joe Stove

Postby JollyRogers » Sun Mar 27, 2011 6:44 pm

An Altoids tin with 2 tea light stoves would work very well for canteen cups. Keep it simple and small. The problem for them will be fuel.

Candle stoves would work well. Candles are cheap and you can get ones that burn a long time.

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ConnieD
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Re: GI Joe Stove

Postby ConnieD » Sun Mar 27, 2011 6:48 pm

I always sent my brother APO no charge, right from the post office. But that was Viet Nam.

The "odorless" gel packs for soldiers, now, "replacing" trioxane tabs have lethal fumes: kidney failure!
Last edited by ConnieD on Sun Mar 27, 2011 6:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

JollyRogers
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Re: GI Joe Stove

Postby JollyRogers » Sun Mar 27, 2011 6:53 pm

Yeah if you check the USPS site the show flat rates to APO addresses based on package size.

As for the fumes, that is nothing new.

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ConnieD
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Re: GI Joe Stove

Postby ConnieD » Sun Mar 27, 2011 6:56 pm

Those gel packs are deadly.

Do not breathe near the stove.

I would be interested in what zelph comes up with.

JollyRogers
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Re: GI Joe Stove

Postby JollyRogers » Sun Mar 27, 2011 11:01 pm

Honestly, a pocket wood burner like his current design would be ideal. then they could use whatever fuel is available.
They won't be purifying water, so it doesn't need to boil anything. It just needs to heat food and make a hot drinks.

Alcohol burners are too hot/tempermental and fuel supply would be an issue. Candle stoves would be ok, but any wind and they go out or don't produce enough heat. They also have the supply issue.

What would be ideal is a solid fuel burner that is simple, compact and durable. Wood burners heat fine even in wind. Fuel is readily available, no supply chain is necessary. You could use solid fuel tabs, wood, manure or whatever.
It just needs to conform to issued equipment.


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