"Jack" Stove

Post your new stove ideas here! All stoves welcome.
realityguy
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Re: "Jack" Stove

Postby realityguy » Sun Jan 02, 2011 6:27 pm

Don't know where all the baking is but ..look at the "sheba 2" stove ..simplicity stove..I had some other models between those I had posted pictures of somewhere.Look through my realityguy files(through the picture links in the threads)..should be some baking/stove making instruction shots in there..
Most of the baking was around my berries in the yard getting ripe..so "blackberries" and "raspberries" ,"bear poop brownies".."pudding ring" ..searches should bring up more baking.
My "altoids stove" has like 6 levels of burning with three individual burners and potstand that all fit in the square altoids bin..with tweezers to pull them out.. :lol:
No..I'm not just a "water boiler".. :mrgreen:
The views and opinions expressed by this person are his own and not the general consensus of others on this website.Realityguy

JollyRogers
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Re: "Jack" Stove

Postby JollyRogers » Sun Jan 02, 2011 9:33 pm

ConnieD wrote:It looks like it turned out "just right" !

I think I like your particular double-wall baking system, held separate by the silicone ring at the top.


I have a small size pancake turner, I found for backpacking use, that has the spatula made of silicone on a metal insert.

I find silicone feels greasy, so it is difficult for me to know when I have got it washed clean.

It is also a lint-magnet, so I keep it inside a plastic bag.

Do you have that problem?

The silicone lid does not have a greasy feeling at all. I know what you are referring to. I have a silicone baking sheet I use when I make pizzas in the oven and it feels the same way. The lid in the cook set doesn't feel like that at all. It cleans easily and doesn't collect lint/debris.
zelph wrote:Yes, those are nice size for big muffins. Is it difficult to get them to completely bake all the way through. 3 ounces of fuel is high for half batch muffin mix.

Difficulty- not at all. Mix it, fill and light the stove, put it on the stove. Go away until the fuel runs out. Eat.
If you use the right fuel you don't have to refuel, or add extra water to the cook pot or anything.
Yes it is a bit of fuel, but then again this isn't a "baking" stove and you are effectively baking at 212 degrees. It is a "Jack of all Trades" cook set. You can bake with it without any extra gear. The stove burns just long enough and hot enough to complete the task with the items in the cook set.
I didn't start this thread with any intent of competing with anyone's stove or breaking any efficiency records. :roll:
Could I make a better baking set? Yes.
Can I make a more efficient stove? Yes.
Will either one of those do everything this stove can do without extra gear/accessories? No
Heck, I can take a couple of tin loaf pans and cook a whole batch of muffin mix at 1 time with about the same amount of fuel. It's browned and everything. But it requires more gear, more fiddling, and more work to make good food. The water in the pot is used to diminish/regualte the heat of the stove and evenly cook the muffins. Perfect, burn proof muffins come at the cost of fuel efficiency. This stove isn't designed to impress the stovies. It is a complete set designed to be marketed to those who don't have the time or inclination to build and design cooking gear. It is designed to be convenient/easy to use and multi-purpose.

This is a cook SET. Designed to be used a variety of ways with the kit it is pictured with. I think many forget that fact. When all is said an done, it will be a complete set that can easily cook for 2 people using wood/alcohol and be able to boil, bake and heat not only basic provisions but also a few comfort foods for the trail. The fact that the set will have the option to use wood as a fuel source really eliminates the necessity for counting every dram of fuel.

This cook set is about convenience and functionality. Not gram counting or fuel efficiency.
I will sell someone a stove or accessories separately if they want it, but the whole idea is that you can buy a cook set without all of the guess work. You know the burn times, you know how it can bake, you know how many cups it holds, you know you can use wood to cook with, etc. etc.

As stated when I first posted here... most people build a stove and then try to find gear/make recipes to work with it. I put together my gear/recipes and then built the stove to match.

Again... I never claimed to re-invent the wheel here, I'm just trying to pave the road the wheel rolls on.

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Ridgerunner
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Re: "Jack" Stove

Postby Ridgerunner » Sun Jan 02, 2011 10:33 pm

Connie, I think some of RG's berry treats can be seen in the following link ;)
http://www.bplite.com/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=523&start=180

also using the search option at the top of the page for "sheba" will link you to RG's stoves. ;)
"Many of lifes failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up".....Thomas Edison

"Live Life....Love Life....Ask More !

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ridebks
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Re: "Jack" Stove

Postby ridebks » Mon Jan 03, 2011 10:39 am

I wanted to quote Jollyrogers but didn't want to take up the whole page. I think you should just stick to marketing the stove and leave the kit alone. The stove is very nice work, but the rest of the kit can be found at local stores and is extremly heavy. The whole part of a cook kit is to find what works for you, and you've done that for you! There are not too many whole cook kits available out there (Trangia comes to mind) and for good reason. Most backpackers, campers, outdoorsman are constantly changing their gear to see what works best. This stove, with this pot,or this set up for 1 person, another for two or three people! What you have done works for you and that's great! There is no need to justify your ideas or projects, especially here on bp! Hell, I am in the process of trying to duplicate your stove! One thing I keep in mind is that everyone on this thread is a bad ass in most everything outdoors. I listen, and take what they say to heart and learn form it.Keep up the good work and good luck!

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zelph
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Re: "Jack" Stove

Postby zelph » Mon Jan 03, 2011 3:10 pm

This is a cook SET. Designed to be used a variety of ways with the kit it is pictured with. I think many forget that fact. When all is said an done, it will be a complete set that can easily cook for 2 people using wood/alcohol and be able to boil, bake and heat not only basic provisions but also a few comfort foods for the trail. The fact that the set will have the option to use wood as a fuel source really eliminates the necessity for counting every dram of fuel.

As stated when I first posted here... most people build a stove and then try to find gear/make recipes to work with it. I put together my gear/recipes and then built the stove to match.


I totally agree. I saw a thread today at whiteblaze where someone found the perfect mug and wants to build around it. Is dead set on the mug.

When all is said an done, it will be a complete set that can easily cook for 2 people using wood/alcohol and be able to boil, bake and heat not only basic provisions but also a few comfort foods for the trail. The fact that the set will have the option to use wood as a fuel source really eliminates the necessity for counting every dram of fuel.


That's the way to go, sell your kit as one ready to go for 2 people. There are many out there that just want to buy everything all at once and do without any hassle. They have ready money and plan on heading off for a weekend of fun and want something now There are markets for everything. Your kit serves the purpose. well done !!!
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

JollyRogers
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Re: "Jack" Stove

Postby JollyRogers » Mon Jan 03, 2011 3:15 pm

ridebks wrote:I wanted to quote Jollyrogers but didn't want to take up the whole page. I think you should just stick to marketing the stove and leave the kit alone. The stove is very nice work, but the rest of the kit can be found at local stores and is extremly heavy. The whole part of a cook kit is to find what works for you, and you've done that for you! There are not too many whole cook kits available out there (Trangia comes to mind) and for good reason. Most backpackers, campers, outdoorsman are constantly changing their gear to see what works best. This stove, with this pot,or this set up for 1 person, another for two or three people! What you have done works for you and that's great! There is no need to justify your ideas or projects, especially here on bp! Hell, I am in the process of trying to duplicate your stove! One thing I keep in mind is that everyone on this thread is a bad ass in most everything outdoors. I listen, and take what they say to heart and learn form it.Keep up the good work and good luck!



Well, I'll have to say I appreciate your input. And as to the length of my posts... I ain't proud... and I have lots of free time. :D

However, I do think there is a market for cook sets. And so, we can just agree to disagree. Nuff said about that.
As to people changing gear, sure, if they change where they are going or who they are going with it is a necessity. However, most people I know use what works and don't replace something unless it doesn't meet all of their needs or it breaks... All of my packs are at least 15 years old. My canteens even older. Do I use them every time I go camping? No, but I use them every time I carry a pack on my back.
As to changing gear according to how many people or other variables, I never said this would be my only cook set. ;) There will be others, with different applications. Right now I have ideas for another cook set that can be used as a griddle for cooking pancakes or grilling meats, eggs, etc.
Most of the items are available at stores, yup. That's the idea. If something breaks/melts/gets lost it is easy to replace. However, for the initial investment you don't need to run all over town to hopefully find everything you need for your cook set.
We live in a society of instant satisfaction/gratification. Our attention spans as a whole are limited to nanoseconds. Many are just too busy or just don't have the inclination to make a good cook set. (Heck, that fact alone has kept the camping accessories industry afloat for the last 30 years).
I also don't think you are seeing the bigger picture here, or maybe I am just overly optimistic. I'm not trying to market to the experienced stove maker. I am marketing to hikers, campers, hunters, fishermen, ice-fishermen, snow-mobilers, motorcyclists, ATV and 4x4 enthusiasts, Boy scouts, Girl scouts, people who want an emergency kit in their car/house and other organisations. Some of these people may be avid outdoorsmen, but many might only get out once or twice a year. An inexpensive cook set is convenient and works for all of their needs. Heck this thing would even be nice for construction workers to heat up lunch.

You are right as well that there is no need to justify my projects, just as there is no need to criticize them without anything constructive to add. However, isn't that kind of the point of these discussion boards? "Hey! This is what i made, and this is why I made it that way."

You are also right that most everyone here is a bad ass in outdoors knowledge, but what I don't think you consider is that no one asks for a resume on a internet forum. Nor should one be needed. This whole cook set idea is kind of a luxury from my point of view. Many moons ago, I was in the Navy as a medic and never served on a ship. I served with the Marines as a combat medic. I was trained in and later became a survival instructor for various climates. I also taught classes on water purification and later worked in the industry in the deserts of New Mexico. I come from the school that teaches all you need to survive is a knife, fire and healthy feet. The rest can be foraged, built or scavenged. But in reality, even a knife and fire can be found in nature. Now survival skills and bushcraft are kind of a hobby of mine. I don't get to put it to the test as often as I would like but I try to never stagnate. I'm always looking for ways to keep my mind in the game.

So while I appreciate the sentiment, when it comes to the outdoors, this ain't my first rodeo. It's just my first cook set. :mrgreen:
I look around, and listen to what people say, but when someone does something differently than me that doesn't mean that I will say it is automatically wrong. It is just different than what I would do for whatever reasons. All I ask is for the same consideration. Constructive criticism is always appreciated. - Heck I even tried baking muffins in Ziplock bags last night. What a mess. No improvements on burn time or efficiency noted, but at least I tried. :ugeek:

So you guys just keep the ideas coming. My eyes and ears are still open.

EDIT: Zelph, looks like we were posting about the same time. Thanks for the encouragement. :cheers:

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ridebks
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Re: "Jack" Stove

Postby ridebks » Mon Jan 03, 2011 4:58 pm

Just my opinion! That's all! :mrgreen:

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cadyak
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Re: "Jack" Stove

Postby cadyak » Mon Jan 03, 2011 6:42 pm

Nice system you have there JR.
I really like the no-burn concept. I have never tried steam baking, and thought I had to have stuff browned, but that does look yummy and is plenty big enough for me. I have torched a few muffins in my woodstove trials, but finally tried my old outback oven. It works great with coals in a woodstove. I am hoping to bake a bunch of test dishes before I leave monday.
I am still trying to decide on a method for preparing trout this next week in the Smokies. I always used to fry them in a pan in the old days. But I was thinking about baking or grilling.
I have baked a ton of stuff in the FIremug, but havent tried fish yet.
good luck with your setup :geek:

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zelph
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Re: "Jack" Stove

Postby zelph » Mon Jan 03, 2011 7:36 pm

- Heck I even tried baking muffins in Ziplock bags last night. What a mess. No improvements on burn time or efficiency noted, but at least I tried. :ugeek:

So you guys just keep the ideas coming. My eyes and ears are still open.

EDIT: Zelph, looks like we were posting about the same time. Thanks for the encouragement. :cheers:


We want you to keep on baking :D The more kits you put together the better off we all are.

I just bought a muffin recipe book on ebay to hone my skills :o

You've got to go through this thread and see what we've baked with thrift store bought stuff. We're cheap!!!!tight wads :o

viewtopic.php?f=20&t=523
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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Ridgerunner
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Re: "Jack" Stove

Postby Ridgerunner » Mon Jan 03, 2011 9:16 pm

You've got to go through this thread and see what we've baked with thrift store bought stuff. We're cheap!!!!tight wads

AMEN to that Brother Zelph!!! :lol: :lol:
"Many of lifes failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up".....Thomas Edison

"Live Life....Love Life....Ask More !


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