Wick material

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shingaling
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Re: Wick material

Post by shingaling » Sat Apr 10, 2010 12:07 pm

What about the fiberglass sheaths used to cover wires in light fixtures? I've been scrounging some when I see it, but have NOT done extensive testing with it. (I'm very cheap, and I try to make due with junk I can scrounge before I go out and buy new material, especially when I intend to set fire to it!)
It comes in all sorts of lengths and diameters. I imagine the consistency(and the flammability) of the material differs greatly from piece to piece. Some tubes are long enough to wrap around a stove. If you threaded a wire through it, it would be easy to slip on and off.
-Shingaling
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zelph
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Re: Wick material

Post by zelph » Sat Apr 10, 2010 2:06 pm

I've used it as a candle wick. Exposed threads will melt because they are so fine. found some on ebay once and it was expensive.
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aambee
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Re: Wick material

Post by aambee » Mon Apr 12, 2010 9:11 pm

I just saw another site where members have discussed using steel wool as a wick material.
Anyone ever try that?
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Ridgerunner
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Re: Wick material

Post by Ridgerunner » Mon Apr 12, 2010 9:52 pm

There may have been someone who tried that here. I can not see steelwool as a wicking material though. If you sat a piece it in a 1/2" bowl of liquid with the rest sticking up above the bowl, I doubt if it would wick the liquid to the top of the steelwool. I may be wrong, JMHO !
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zelph
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Re: Wick material

Post by zelph » Mon Apr 12, 2010 11:26 pm

r= radius of tube length...........Would that be radius of wick??
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aambee
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Re: Wick material

Post by aambee » Mon Apr 12, 2010 11:33 pm

I think it means the radius of the tube. Think half the diameter of a straw.

In fabric, I assume it has to do with how close the fibers are together. Probably in fabric r would be half the distance between the fibers. Steel wool fibers, unless super fine, would likely have a much lager distance from each other than a finer fiber fabric (unofficially F.F.F. ;) ) like fiber glass.
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zelph
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Re: Wick material

Post by zelph » Tue Apr 13, 2010 10:28 am

Thank you just tinkering for clarifying that.

I did a test back in 2006 because of the information floating around on the forums. Later, when the material was introduced by "skidsteer" I did test some black plumbers cloth and found it to be not worthy of a wicking material. Todays carbon fiber material might be different. I'd like to purchase a sheet of the material that you use "just tinkering" Can you give us a name or link to the material you use?

(quoted from a thread in the Stove Factory)

Had to do a test to satisfy my curiosity about the ability of 3 different materials that have been said to be used as wick materials.

Did this test today to clarify in my mind the capillary action of the three materials. Material that does'nt get consumed when used as a wick. Steel wool will burn when lit and enough oxygen supplied, but I included it for my benefit to see if it has any capillary/wicking ability.

1. Fiberglass cloth, used for automotive repair.

2. Pink, home insulation, type used in the Ion and Cat stoves

3. 0000 (very fine) steel wool

The photo shows the fiberglass cloth wick on the left, the pink stuff in the middle and the steel wool on the right.

I first filled the aluminum containers with test material to equal volume/height.

I then removed the material and added 20ml of denatured alcohol to the containers. Volume wise it was about half filled.

I then returned the material to the containers pushing it into the fuel in order to observe the ability to wick it up.

After waiting one min. I tried to light the three materials. The fiberglass cloth lit but not the others. I then snuffed out the one that lit.

After waiting 5 min. I tried it again, same results. I did this three times, the pink insulation and the steel wool did not have the ability to wick up the fuel.

In conclusion I speculate that the pink insulation acts as a buffer/splash preventer in the stoves that use it. Not as a wicking material. When fuel is poured into the burners it provides fuel on the surface which readilly burns and acts as a preheat to the aluminum containers that they are in. The burners are shallow and vapors are close to the surface. They would ignite without the aide of the insulation.

These are my findings in todays test.

Those of you that are interested, conduct this test for yourselves and then report back to verify my conclusion and results.

These photos show the things that I have mentioned.


Image

Image

Image


Edited to add:
Ink in a felt tip pen can wick up the fibers 10 - 20 inches.
Seems to me you could refill felt tip markers by putting the tip into a dish of ink and let it get wicked up into the pen. :o


.
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zelph
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Re: Wick material

Post by zelph » Tue Apr 13, 2010 11:42 am

I'll try today to find it at home depot. thanks for the name and place.
I think I still have the little aluminum containers that I did the original experiment with.
It's an interesting experiment for stove builders to try. It gives a clear example of what works and what doesn't.
People are to this day recommending the use of fiberglass insulation and steel wool as a wicking material. It works for them and in turn perpetuate the use of it and that's okay. They're making stoves and having fun doing it. :D
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zelph
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Re: Wick material

Post by zelph » Tue Apr 13, 2010 10:07 pm

I went to Home Depot and they had the brand "Oatey" $16.00 for a 9"X12" sheet. Too high a price for this guy :D I'll wait till I find it discounted for $4.00 :D
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shingaling
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Re: Wick material

Post by shingaling » Tue Apr 13, 2010 10:23 pm

Today I scrounged one of those fiberglass "seals" that goes around the window of an oven. Haven't tried it yet, but it provides a lot more material than those little insulator tubes from light fixtures. It's free, and probably as close as the nearest scrap yard. Cheap! ;)
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