Windscreen impact on stove perfromance

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ConnieD
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Re: Windscreen impact on stove perfromance

Post by ConnieD » Wed Jun 23, 2010 9:28 pm

BTW, I roll up my "cone clone" and put a soft pony-tail wrap around it and put that inside a double zip ziplock-type freezer bag, because I don't like soot on my expensive and beautiful backpacking gear.

Others cover their Caldera Clone, windscreen clone, or cone and wrap it around the outside of a Nalgene water bottle or a stainless steel thermos.

I liked putting my Caldera Cone inside the Fosters can, however I never used it. I decided I do not want to boil water in a beverage container. I am concerned about BPA's. And, yes, I do not use canned food. I use fresh food or "shelf stable" food.

I don't see why a cone clone couldn't have a folded edge and slide three of four upright sections together. It would be a more compact stowable package.

No matter what, the soot is the main problem.

Keep soot off the inside of the cooking pot.
Keep soot off your backpacking gear.
Keep soot out of your food.
Keep soot off your clothing.
Keep soot off your hands.

I would say, an important objective, is a clean burning alcohol stove, or, dealing with how you are going to pack it.

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zelph
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Re: Windscreen impact on stove perfromance

Post by zelph » Wed Jun 23, 2010 9:56 pm

zelph, inside-out stove or Super Stove :?:
The Super Stove would work better. me thinks. The inside out without the bottom attached is basically a super stove, just a tad larger in diameter.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

Q_x
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Re: Windscreen impact on stove perfromance

Post by Q_x » Thu Jun 24, 2010 2:08 am

sorry, blanked
Last edited by Q_x on Tue Aug 31, 2010 8:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
Delete this account, please

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ConnieD
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Re: Windscreen impact on stove perfromance

Post by ConnieD » Thu Jun 24, 2010 3:14 am

Part of modern performance outdoor gear, both clothing and equipment like pack, tarp or tent, sleeping bag fabric, or Bivouac fabric is breathability or wicking, as well as water shedding surface or "face" of the fabric.

The soot consists of very fine particles that clog up the works.

I have had traditional fabrics: wool serge, heavy weight woolen, British ventile cloth jacket, fine wool mock turtleneck first layer, alpaca, wool and silk: all have their excellent qualities reduced by soot.

The soot interfers with your own breathing freely. It is the particle size, more than the carbon.

The carbon is dirty, clogs pores, is difficult to wash thoroughly, and so, your personal appearance degrades to the level of the people in cities who are sleeping out on-the-street. Really, only the chronically homeless get a black grime from sleeping on-the-street. If you have soot, you look like that right away in dirty clothing or you and your clothing needing to get cleaned up and fresh.

In North America, at least in this country, we have no hosteling tradition, no "student-travel" and no vagabonding. If you are out and about and you are dirty, you are a vagrant.

It has become important for hikers to not be seen as homeless or as vagrants here in this country, especially thru-hikers walking hundreds and even thousands of miles for their hike. I have been active in thru-hiker forums from time to time, helping with various subjects with my website. That participation helps me realise how much people do not know. And so, I add more to my website.

But, on point, it is the thru-hikers and the long distance section hikers who want these efficient and lightweight backpacking stoves.

Anyone out for an overnight camping experience, or, even a weekend can easily wash up and get into a restaurant, for example, enroute to their home back in town or city. But a hiker out for a minimum of 4-5 days wants lightweight and highly efficient or effective gear, or why bother with it. They will use something else that works better or carry only "cold camp" food.

I like this forum so much because I like technical subjects, the people are fun, and really, the people here, come up with great ideals and great stuff. At the same time, I never lose sight of the goal: the backpacker or bicycle tourist or the canoe or kayak camping interests people have,

I am very passionate about having a lightweight, effective, efficient cooking system for backpacking. I like what just tinkering is doing in this thread.

The most important thing about soot is it gets everywhere and it carries food odors. Small animals will chew your gear and large animals, like bears, may tear up your gear and may even hurt you. I live in grizzly bear country. It is imperative to keep food odors off your gear and off your camp and off you. I use Aloksak Opsak and dry bags for kayaking for food and food related gear. I eat earlier in the afternoon, before I get to the sleeping campsite. This is how we do it here.

Q_x
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Re: Windscreen impact on stove perfromance

Post by Q_x » Thu Jun 24, 2010 10:06 am

sorry, blanked
Last edited by Q_x on Tue Aug 31, 2010 8:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
Delete this account, please

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zelph
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Re: Windscreen impact on stove perfromance

Post by zelph » Thu Jun 24, 2010 10:54 am

Using isopropyl alcohol can easily cause soot on pots. Wind turbulence can easily disturb a flame so as to to have it cause soot.
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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ConnieD
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Re: Windscreen impact on stove perfromance

Post by ConnieD » Thu Jun 24, 2010 11:07 am

Yes.

The thread started talking about packability of the windscreen. I have got very little soot, by the way, "in the field" with your windscreen and your Super Stove. I like that. It is much easier for my present system of keeping everything clean. The Coleman gas version was very sooty, but it helps if I had followed written instructions. I like the little alcohol stove because there is so little soot and has vety little odor that shouts "camper" with food.

I mentioned all this, because I hope soot is a consideration.

Q_x has been dealing with soot.

just tinkering has been dealing with the windscreen and air flow around the stove.

I am hopeful soot will be minimized.

sudden
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Re: Windscreen impact on stove perfromance

Post by sudden » Thu Jun 24, 2010 11:59 am

jt,

figure 17, 18, 21, and the gap tables in this link could be related to your windscreen performances
http://stoves.bioenergylists.org/stoves ... stoves.pdf

The article is about wood stoves so it could go in the tent heater or wood stove contest posts but I think they did some interesting work on heat transfer to the pot (this is ultimately what you are accomplishing with the windscreen and boil time variation). They also have a standardized form for recording boil times (pg 34).


connied,

Here's a bunch of technical articles for you.
http://pdfebooksreader.com/ebook-design ... pdf-1.html
"People are not persuaded by what we say, but rather by what they understand."

sudden
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Re: Windscreen impact on stove perfromance

Post by sudden » Tue Jul 06, 2010 4:10 pm

With everything else being equal (stove, height of air barrier, pot, etc) it is interesting how the two windscreens performance is so different.

The 20sec difference at first is close but when the air barrier is added there is a huge jump in performance between the two.

Can't wait to see what you do next.
"People are not persuaded by what we say, but rather by what they understand."

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zelph
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Re: Windscreen impact on stove perfromance

Post by zelph » Sat Jul 10, 2010 12:46 am

Again, measurable reductions in boil times can be seen by adding this simple plate.
How many tests performed?

In your opinion, what is causing the difference in boil times? What is the plate doing?
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

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