Mystery Tool 28

A hand held tool or device, see if you can guess what it is.
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zelph
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Mystery Tool 28

Postby zelph » Sun Mar 30, 2008 4:42 pm

Tell me the name of the tool and the shaving of wood that comes off it. Tell me more if you can!!!

Image

Image
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

oops56
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Re: Mystery Tool 28

Postby oops56 » Sun Mar 30, 2008 4:54 pm

Tooth picks
Man play with fire man get burnt

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russb
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Re: Mystery Tool 28

Postby russb » Sun Mar 30, 2008 5:16 pm

It is a plane of some sorts.

Allen
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Re: Mystery Tool 28

Postby Allen » Sun Mar 30, 2008 6:03 pm

That tool makes the shavings to be used as a match, or fire lighter.
I saw one once on Roy Uhderhill's TV show. :)
That one looks to be of excellent quality too!

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DarenN
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Re: Mystery Tool 28

Postby DarenN » Sun Mar 30, 2008 6:42 pm

HA!
i win!!!!!!!!
it's called a "spill plane".
it is used to make curled shavings (spills) that are use to light the fire, or your pipe, or the stove.
my grandfather had one nailed to the mantle at the old homestead farm in Saskatchewan. as kids we were not allowed to play with it.
DarenN.........
"I'd rather be happy than right." Slartibartfast

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zelph
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Re: Mystery Tool 28

Postby zelph » Mon Mar 31, 2008 2:24 pm

I'll be gone for the remainder of the week so here is the answer. I thought this one was going to be a stumper :D


zelph wrote:Tell me the name of the tool and the chaving of wood that comes off it. Tell me more if you can!!!

Image

Image


Daren did give us the correct answer first and Allen new of the tool also but forget what they were called.

Here is some additional info on the Spill plane and how Spills were used:

Christopher Swingley
Introduction
Enclosed is a benchtop spill plane, designed to reduce scraps of wood into long, tightly curled shavings called
spills. Before matches were available to anyone but the wealthy, people used spills to transfer fire from the
fireplace to a candle or pipe. Spill planes were almost always craftsman–made, and the spills themselves
were a welcome way to recycle wood scraps in the family, or in exchange for a beer at the local tavern. A
cup filled with spills was kept on the mantle for use, and there was even a specific piece of glassware (also
called a spill) designed to hold the shavings.
This particular variety is a benchtop spill plane, which means that the plane is affixed to the benchtop (in
a clamp or vise) and scraps are passed over it to produce spills. Spill planes were also made to pass over a
piece of wood, more like a traditional plane.
The plans for this particular plane come from a 2002 episode of Roy Underhill’s The Woodwright’s Show
which airs on PBS. This version is made from sugar maple purchased in Madison, Wisconsin (and dragged
through the Madison and Fairbanks airports), with an iron made from a backsaw blade and a wedge from
an old 2×4. The plane body was finished with four coats of boiled linseed oil, and the wedge was dyed dark
brown using an aniline dye. The plane was built completely by hand using only traditional tools.
Plans and some images showing the construction of the plane can be seen at http://www.frontier.iarc.uaf.edu/
cswingle/woodworking/benchtop spill plane.php
1

Setting up
The iron, wedge, and body of the plane were packed seperately. The iron is bedded against the more steeply
sloped side of the mortise through the plane, with the bezel of the iron facing toward the mortise (see the
figure below). The wedge is then inserted to hold the iron in place. Once the parts are loosely in place,
sight down the plane from the back (the arrow in the figure shows the direction wood is moved – from left
to right down the plane) and arrange the iron so only a bit of it extends above the bottom of the groove
plowed in the top of the plane. It should project about 1/64 of an inch above the groove, and be even all the
way across the groove.
Once the iron is arranged as indicated, tightly seat the wedge in the mortise by pressing on the right side of
the wedge. With this particular plane I have found that you get a better fit if the left end of the wedge is
also pushed down against the floor of the mortise at the same time that you seat the wedge from the right.
The wedge can be removed by lightly tapping the left end of the wedge, but it shouldn’t require tapping on
the right side to seat the wedge.
Iron
Right side
Wedge
Once the iron and wedge are suitably set, affix the plane to your bench. You can do this by clamping it in a
vise, or by attaching a clamp to the plane and then clamping the clamp to your bench. It’s also possible to
use the plane simply by pushing the front of the plane up against a stop projecting above your benchtop.
To use the plane to produce spills, take a scrap of wood without knots or twisted grain (soft pine of the 1× variety works well) and quickly and firmly slide it down the groove over the iron. The longer the scrap, the
longer the spill.
If the wood catches immediately and the wood won’t go any further, don’t force it. This could either be
because you are planing against the grain, or because the iron is set too rank and needs to be lowered
2

slightly. If the bite of the iron into the wood resulted in a very thick shaving, the iron should be lowered. If
the thickness of the shaving is reasonably thin (the thickness of a paperback book cover is about right), try
turning the wood around and plane the other direction.
If the plane produces a few good spills but quickly stops making full length shavings, the wedge is probably
not tight enough and the iron has shifted due to the force of planing. If this happens you will need to re-set
the iron to be parallel across the groove, and tightly seat the wedge again. The first few times you use the
plane will probably be a bit frustrating as you try to discover the factors that contribute to good (and bad)
shavings. Stick with it. After a few tries, you will be able to produce nicely curled spills over and over.
The groove in the top of the plane was waxed using paste wax. It is possible that poor performance of
the plane may be due to increased friction as the wood slides down the groove. A light waxing will help,
although the plane will perform even without it.
The iron will eventually dull and will need to be sharpened. The bezel angle is approximately 30 degrees, but
I didn’t measure it specifically. I ground the original bezel using a hand cranked grinder and then sharpened
it using varying grits of sandpaper on glass (stopping at 800 grit). Oil, water, or diamond stones would also
work. A knife sharpener will not work because knives have a bevel on each side of the blade. The blade
in most planes have one flat surface and one bevelled side. Given that you probably won’t be producing
thousands of spills, the iron will likely stay sharp enough.
When storing the plane for long periods of time, it’s best to loosen the wedge because it will expand and
contract through the seasons. The force of the wedge expanding could crack the plane body, although in
this case (fir wedge, maple body) I think it’s pretty unlikely.

http://www.craftsofnj.org/toolshed/arti ... Planes.htm
http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/

Tony
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Re: Mystery Tool 28

Postby Tony » Mon Mar 31, 2008 5:10 pm

Hi Zelph,

Thanks for the great information on the Spill plane, the answer was posted quicker that I thought.

I am wondering if a spills device could be designed super lightweight as an alternative to matches for backpacking.

Tony

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russb
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Re: Mystery Tool 28

Postby russb » Mon Mar 31, 2008 5:53 pm

Tony wrote:Hi Zelph,


I am wondering if a spills device could be designed super lightweight as an alternative to matches for backpacking.

Tony


I call them "twigs", find 'em on the ground all around the campfire area, and they are perfect for lighting candles or stoves.

Allen
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Re: Mystery Tool 28

Postby Allen » Mon Mar 31, 2008 6:15 pm

Congrats DarenN!

Those small plastic Pencil sharpeners that kids have in their bookbags, work pretty good at making
small shavings from dry twigs of the correct diameter. I keep one in My Emergency bag.

Cheers! :)

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DarenN
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Re: Mystery Tool 28

Postby DarenN » Mon Mar 31, 2008 7:17 pm

thanks Allen;
i now have a big red welt on my forehead from the "SMACK! why didn't i think of that!?" a pencil sharpenner! brilliant!!
DarenN.......
"I'd rather be happy than right." Slartibartfast


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